Your thoughts on this framing job

  
  • Thread Starter
#21  
OP
EddieWalker

EddieWalker

Epic Contributor
Joined
May 26, 2003
Messages
22,859
Location
Tyler, Texas
Tractor
Several, all used and abused.
Thanks Randy. The place where the damage happened said that they had high winds, but hasn't replied to any of my questions. I asked another friend in the area, and she said that they winds where not very bad at their place. I looked online to see what was reported and only saw the winds in the mid 20's.

Regardless of the wind speed, the framing on the wall has some horrible flaws. One of the reasons that I haven't heard back from them might be that I said that it might have been a blessing that it collapsed now, and not later on when it was all done and people where inside there.

Here are a few more pictures that I found on her FB page.

53400584_10219183268199513_7806001583287697408_n.jpg

53067834_10219090211473153_3552599503309635584_n.jpg

I think this last picture shows the main issue. The studs only go up 8 feet and then they started framing again on top of the double top plates. There isn't any strength there to keep the wall standing up straight and it just folded in on itself.
 

hr3

Veteran Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2008
Messages
1,208
Location
Mid. Coast Maine
Tractor
7610 hst
Thanks Randy. The place where the damage happened said that they had high winds, but hasn't replied to any of my questions. I asked another friend in the area, and she said that they winds where not very bad at their place. I looked online to see what was reported and only saw the winds in the mid 20's.

Regardless of the wind speed, the framing on the wall has some horrible flaws. One of the reasons that I haven't heard back from them might be that I said that it might have been a blessing that it collapsed now, and not later on when it was all done and people where inside there.

Here are a few more pictures that I found on her FB page.

View attachment 595704

View attachment 595705

I think this last picture shows the main issue. The studs only go up 8 feet and then they started framing again on top of the double top plates. There isn't any strength there to keep the wall standing up straight and it just folded in on itself.

You nailed it it is like a deck of cards just waiting to come down. Not one stud going up all thee way. Also if you look close at the very first pic. you posted, they don't look like 2by4's ?? If you compare the 2 pieces of scrap wood to the plank on the staging it's thinner even the rafters look thin. Maybe it's just the angle ...
 

Rustyiron

Super Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
5,026
Location
Lakes Region, Maine
Tractor
M 9540 Kubota
Eddie you know that there are "vulnerable" stages of construction where all the parts to the puzzle are not there yet and wind happens.
I see a few small issues with the end wall but in theory, it's just an end wall that might be a little bouncy without continuous framing members full height, and the framed roof should hold it's self up. It looks as if the roof was at least sheathed and I didn't see any "collar ties". That & sheathing on the side walls may have been all it needed to live through that storm. I think that was why the wind took it and I don't think I'd condemn the framer just by these pics. The right wall and the gable end are both laying IN the space. I can't make out where the left wall ended up.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#24  
OP
EddieWalker

EddieWalker

Epic Contributor
Joined
May 26, 2003
Messages
22,859
Location
Tyler, Texas
Tractor
Several, all used and abused.
Where would you put sheathing? It's all windows and a huge door opening.
 

Diggin It

Super Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
9,850
Location
Three Posts A Day. Or less.
Tractor
LS MT125 TLBM
I can't speak the engineering, but if I was at that point when I quit for the day, I would have put a bunch of bracing on that.

There was no visible lateral bracing in the end wall. Without see more complete photos, that's why it fell over. More questions... The header has no hurricane clips in it, which could be added later. And the header looks to be grossly under sized. Hummmm

Eddie you know that there are "vulnerable" stages of construction where all the parts to the puzzle are not there yet and wind happens.
I see a few small issues with the end wall but in theory, it's just an end wall that might be a little bouncy without continuous framing members full height, and the framed roof should hold it's self up. It looks as if the roof was at least sheathed and I didn't see any "collar ties". That & sheathing on the side walls may have been all it needed to live through that storm. I think that was why the wind took it and I don't think I'd condemn the framer just by these pics. The right wall and the gable end are both laying IN the space. I can't make out where the left wall ended up.


I'm thinking this is just very, very bad timing. It's obviously no where near finished, so we can't know what the end product would look like. My question is, did the contractor know about the storm potential? If so, they should have done extra temporary bracing. Maybe the storm intensity caught them all off guard?

Certainly not the first building skeleton taken down by high winds.
 

Deere Dude

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
3,844
Location
Beaver Dam Wisconsin then to Hohenwald, TN
Tractor
John Deere 3720
I didn't see any bracing to keep the side walls from being able to spread out because of the weight and torque generated by the roof joists. As a very young rookie I built a 26x40 garage something like that one time with 4/12 pitch roof joists, but I had cables strung from side to side to keep from spreading the walls. I know, should have had trusses but I was tight. My very first project in 1975. I didn't like it and was glad a tornado came and moved it into the field next door.
 

Diggin It

Super Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
9,850
Location
Three Posts A Day. Or less.
Tractor
LS MT125 TLBM
As a very young rookie I built a 26x40 garage something like that one time with 4/12 pitch roof joists, but I had cables strung from side to side to keep from spreading the walls. I know, should have had trusses but I was tight.

My current 24x30 garage is similar in that the roof system was stick built on site instead of using trusses, but it does look very similar to trusses with 24' rafters. I plan on copying it for my shed if I decide to build it. I just think the skeleton being discussed wasn't finished before the storm.
 

ArlyA

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
3,894
Location
Houghton MI (the Lake Superior snow belt) USA
Tractor
Polaris Boss 6x6 with pods (tracks) Center actuating lawn mower by Husky
I'm thinking this is just very, very bad timing. It's obviously no where near finished, so we can't know what the end product would look like. My question is, did the contractor know about the storm potential? If so, they should have done extra temporary bracing. Maybe the storm intensity caught them all off guard?
Certainly not the first building skeleton taken down by high winds.

The builder is responsible for his construction and weather they pay attention to the forecast or not, is not the home owners job.. The end wall should have had lateral bracing at this point. They come out as the sheathing goes up.
 

Oldoak

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
1,810
Tractor
Kubota L5060GST, J D X758 GT, J D 855D XUV
I'm thinking this is just very, very bad timing. It's obviously no where near finished, so we can't know what the end product would look like. My question is, did the contractor know about the storm potential? If so, they should have done extra temporary bracing. Maybe the storm intensity caught them all off guard?

Certainly not the first building skeleton taken down by high winds.
I think you "nailed" it!

With all the speculation and armchair engineering eyeing missing this and missing that. Who knows just how far along the construction actually was? How much was yet to be added? Incomplete construction projects such as that are always weaker than the finished product, particularly during storms with high winds.
 

ovrszd

Epic Contributor
Joined
May 27, 2006
Messages
28,937
Location
Missouri
Tractor
Kubota M9540, Ford 3910FWD, Ford 555A, JD2210
No armchair engineering here. If my builder was splicing vertical structural items I would intervene. A properly built skeleton would have had a much better chance of survival.
 
 
Top