6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi

   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #11  

Hay Dude

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My opinion:

The GM 6.0L is the most proven, but leaves a lot to be desired in regard to towing.

The new GM 6.6L is a beast, but has only been out a couple of years. It’s paired to a six speed transmission.

The Ram 6.4L is a good puller, but anything with cylinder deactivation starts out with a giant reliability weakness. The first version came out in MY 2014 and required 89 octane fuel. It is similar to, but very different than the 6.4L used in the Dodge sports cars. I believe it was in MY 2019, Ram moved from a six speed to eight speed transmission.

The Ford 7.3L is the current big dog, but has only been out around as long as the new GM 6.6L. In regard to purely towing capability (legal), this is the best.

The Ford 6.2L has been around, in the “Super Duty” line, since MY 2011. For MY 2017, the engine was revised and produced more torque at a lower RPM. This engine has a great reputation, for reliability. Prior to being used (in a de-tuned setup) in the SD line, it was used in the MY 2010 Harley Davidson F-150 and SVT RAPTOR. From MY 2011-2014, you could get the (full power) 6.2L in a regular F-150, as well.

The GM 6.6L, Ram 6.4L, and Ford 7.3L are used in the larger chassis cabs. The 6.2L never was used above an F-350. Prior to the 7.3L, the 6.8L V10 was used, in the F-450/F-550’s. The 6.8L V10 was put in F-250 to F-350 trucks, prior to MY 2011.

The 6.2L is a SOHC type. The rest listed are the old school pushrod.


With any of these, getting the biggest numerical value rear end ratio is a good idea, if you’re towing. My Ford 6.2L has the 4.30. None of them will get good fuel mileage, towing heavy. Gasoline engines make their power higher in the revolution range, these are large engines. Put that together and you get poor overall fuel economy.

My 2014 is a crew cab chassis cab with a ten feet long flatbed. It weighs around 9k pounds, with me driving and no load. My dump trailer is just over 5k, empty. It’s rated to around 15k and I’m frequently around that weight. I’ve pulled a few trailers over 20k and it does fine. I wouldn’t recommend the 6.2L, for that weight, everyday, but the Ford 7.3L is rated for it. One thing I like about the F-350, with the 6.2L, is it uses the same transmission as the much more powerful turbo diesel (a couple of small parts are different). I believe you will find this is true of the other brands, but I’m not sure. Note, the F-250 uses a “weaker” transmission, but it’s still highly regarded.


ETA: I forgot to mention the Ford offers a 10-speed transmission, now. The six speed is still available, but limited.

I would suggest not just assuming “more gears is better”. I’m not saying you are, but some people have a “more is always better” mentality.
Vehicles are very complex and seemingly more so every year.

Simplicity to make repairs more affordable is not even considered anymore.
I have early 2000’s farm tractors. They still break and they still cost plenty to fix, but the new ones???? Wow!

Ive pretty much reached the point where if you buy a new vehicle, you better make sure it’s got ample warranty coverage, because you can’t fix much of anything anymore.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #12  

nikerret

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I would suggest not just assuming “more gears is better”. I’m not saying you are, but some people have a “more is always better” mentality.
Vehicles are very complex and seemingly more so every year.

Simplicity to make repairs more affordable is not even considered anymore.
I have early 2000’s farm tractors. They still break and they still cost plenty to fix, but the new ones???? Wow!

As far as “more gears is better”, we agree. From what I’ve seen (haven’t driven one), the new 10-speeds do a lot of shifting. For my use, I don’t spend enough time at one speed to get any benefit, from the extra gears. The six speed has been great. Add to that the new “extra gears” transmissions are not proven, in regard to reliability.

As far as simplicity of repairs, it doesn’t get too much easier than a V8 pushrod. Even my Ford SOHC is easy to work on, compared to most modern vehicles. Most parts are commonly available, too, which is nice. I do my own maintenance and repairs. It’s so easy, even I can do it.

Thats one thing about the lower trim gas engine “HD” pickups. They are the easiest vehicle to repair, other than a motorcycle. The higher trims complicates that, a lot.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #13  

Hay Dude

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I’m just saying there’s no emphasis on simplicity or giving the owner anything easy to repair. It’s going in the other direction and it’s purposeful
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi
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deerefan

deerefan

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As far as “more gears is better”, we agree. From what I’ve seen (haven’t driven one), the new 10-speeds do a lot of shifting. For my use, I don’t spend enough time at one speed to get any benefit, from the extra gears. The six speed has been great. Add to that the new “extra gears” transmissions are not proven, in regard to reliability.

As far as simplicity of repairs, it doesn’t get too much easier than a V8 pushrod. Even my Ford SOHC is easy to work on, compared to most modern vehicles. Most parts are commonly available, too, which is nice. I do my own maintenance and repairs. It’s so easy, even I can do it.

Thats one thing about the lower trim gas engine “HD” pickups. They are the easiest vehicle to repair, other than a motorcycle. The higher trims complicates that, a lot.

Nothing higher than XL/LS/Tradesman trim for me. I prefer 3.73-4.11 gears. This truck will be used as a farm truck mainly. Cloth seats and rubber floors are just fine.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #15  

nikerret

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Nothing higher than XL/LS/Tradesman trim for me. I prefer 3.73-4.11 gears. This truck will be used as a farm truck mainly. Cloth seats and rubber floors are just fine.

In regard to rear ratio, the Fords come with 3.73 or 4.30. The Ram with a 3.73 or 4.10. GM only offers the 3.73, in the 2500/3500 series.

The Ford 6.2L w/4.30 is rated about the sane as the 7.3L w/3.73.

I would definitely want the 4.30, with the Ford 6.2L and the 4.10, with the Ram 6.4L. With the GM 6.6L it’s not an option, so that’s easier. With the Ford 7.3L, I would want the 4.30, but it’s less important, if you’re not going to tow over 15k, often.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #16  

BoylermanCT

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2021 Ram 2500 with 6.4 rated to tow 17,000 lbs.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #17  

oosik

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My 2018 Ram 2500 Power Wagon has a 6.4 L hemi. 22K miles and not a single problem.

And, YES - the newer trucks are very complex.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #18  

WilliamBos

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GM 6.6 is a huge improvement over the 6.0. The 7.3 is the Godzilla Pushrod big block, I would not touch a 6.2 with a 10 foot pole. The 6.4 Hemi is a great option if you do not want or need a Cummins.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #19  

coobie

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GM 6.6 is a huge improvement over the 6.0. The 7.3 is the Godzilla Pushrod big block, I would not touch a 6.2 with a 10 foot pole. The 6.4 Hemi is a great option if you do not want or need a Cummins.
Have a a 6.2 engine with the 10 speed tranny in my 2020 Yukon and love it.21-22 mpg,s highway 18 mpg,s city/highway.
 
   / 6.0vs6.6, 6.2vs7.3, 6.4 Hemi #20  

nikerret

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GM 6.6 is a huge improvement over the 6.0. The 7.3 is the Godzilla Pushrod big block, I would not touch a 6.2 with a 10 foot pole. The 6.4 Hemi is a great option if you do not want or need a Cummins.

Which 6.2L and why not?
 
 
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