Crazy idea?

   #51  

bmaverick

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Probably too late for this suggestion, but wondering if you considered mounting a PS pump to the backside of the alternator and in line axially with it. Would require a hole in the backside of the alternator and then a shaft extension/connector to the pump. May not be feasible but just thought I'd throw it out there.

Edit--Picture shows the backside of a Kubota alternator or "dynamo" as they call it. I replaced this one thinking it was bad but turned out to be the regulator IIRC.

Oh my, this is a flash back. some of those Japan cars form the 60s and 70s had those combo alternator and PS setups. And some were even alternator and water-pump setups.
 
  
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#52  
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etpm

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Whidbey Island, WA
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yanmar ym2310
Probably too late for this suggestion, but wondering if you considered mounting a PS pump to the backside of the alternator and in line axially with it. Would require a hole in the backside of the alternator and then a shaft extension/connector to the pump. May not be feasible but just thought I'd throw it out there.

Edit--Picture shows the backside of a Kubota alternator or "dynamo" as they call it. I replaced this one thinking it was bad but turned out to be the regulator IIRC.
I did look at anywhere and everyehere to put the pump. Your suggestion won't work because there is a big coolant hose that curls directly behind the alternator. This hose connects to both the water pump and the block. I also considered going up high enough to clear the fuel lines but going up that high would require some pretty long pump mounting structure parts which would require some extra bracing and fitting in that bracing would require using more mounting points and the whole thing was starting to resemble a Rube Goldberg construction. I wanted a fairly simple and elegant setup. It now looks like to get closest to that I will need use the tractor hydraulics.
Eric
 
  
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#53  
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etpm

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The aftermarket cylinder and valve combo that I bought does not have that nice looking cast valve. It is just a block of aluminum with a bunch of holes machined in it. That's probably better because it has nice square sides to clamp in a vise if that ever needs to be done.
Eric
 
   #54  

bmaverick

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The aftermarket cylinder and valve combo that I bought does not have that nice looking cast valve. It is just a block of aluminum with a bunch of holes machined in it. That's probably better because it has nice square sides to clamp in a vise if that ever needs to be done.
Eric

For a coolant system, make certain NOT to mix aluminum and copper(bronze and brass too) component materials in the liquid. Doing so would induce galvanic corrosion. Domestic OEs had issues back in the 90s as their OE stuff went fully aluminum, yet the aftermarket parts were copper/brass. Soon, people were blaming the OEs for the mess, but it turned out to be the aftermarket using the copper in their parts.

Anytime I've working on a vehicle or machine with liquid cooling, it's always best to review these components. If not, that ugly browse sludge will kill the radiator and water pump so fast and the engine overheats. In worse cases, the tubes in the radiator completely gunk up.
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And the coolants today called 'long life' are worse for our machines. Those coolants are engineered for all aluminum coolant systems, thus the corrosion inhibitor additives are 1% vs. 10% in the old school green coolants.

I didn't touch on the original GM dexcool problem that is a different brown/orange sludge problem all on it's own due to it being HOAT and not a true OAT coolant.
 
   #55  

California

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Picture shows the backside of a Kubota alternator or "dynamo" as they call it.
I think that's the same dynamo as used on Yanmar. There was an early version with the diodes on the back side of the dynamo, then the more common dynamo version 2 that just contains windings.

I bought a regulator for the version 2, listed on Ebay as Kubota dealer overstock. It was the same thing as Yanmar's regulator and cost less than ones listed for Yanmar.
 
   #56  

California

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I wanted a fairly simple and elegant setup. It now looks like to get closest to that I will need use the tractor hydraulics.
The dealer-installed PS option on my YM186D runs from a diverter valve plumbed ahead of the loader and 3-point. Steering gets all the fluid below 1,000 rpm. The steering is reliable at any rpm but there is no response by the other hydraulic-driven components until 1,000 rpm or more.

I think this is a fair compromise compared to Rube-Goldberging a pump into such a tight engine compartment and that would be one more component to maintain.
 
  
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#57  
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etpm

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The dealer-installed PS option on my YM186D runs from a diverter valve plumbed ahead of the loader and 3-point. Steering gets all the fluid below 1,000 rpm. The steering is reliable at any rpm but there is no response by the other hydraulic-driven components until 1,000 rpm or more.

I think this is a fair compromise compared to Rube-Goldberging a pump into such a tight engine compartment and that would be one more component to maintain.
Yeah, I am now of the same opinion. I'll let you know if my mind changes after I'm done. The weather is starting to get rainy, and I'm almost done with the tractoring I need to get done in the near future. So I can start soon.
Eric
 
 
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