DIY Bridge

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#21  
I had a similar problem to yours. Not quite as big, but similar. Ended up doing it 3 times before I got it right.
Totally agree with Spike56 to get your county storm water dept out there to eyeball it, and see what they say.
If the water gets to 4' deep, in 2"-3" rainstorms, then a bridge may indeed, be a better and cheaper (long term) solution.
Have considered having the creek bed dug out, pouring concrete ‘buttress’ walls on each side and then pouring a thick concrete slab over the buttress walls to drive over but I don’t think it will support heavy equipment. Thanks for comments.
 
   / DIY Bridge #22  
How wide is it if the crossing is perpendicular, not diagonal?

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   / DIY Bridge
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#23  
Others have used sem-trailers in bridge costruction. Not sure if that would meet your specs.
I’ve seen where folks have used retired train cars to span the gap but they’re too much for my budget. Thanks for comments.
 
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#24  
How wide is it if the crossing is perpendicular, not diagonal?

View attachment 778022
Part of the problem is, over the last 20 years, the creek has moved a bit. It used to just flow across the drive after heavy rains. Now water runs and hits my driveway at the east end (bank) of the drive then doglegs west, with half the water turning south after about 30 ft and the rest of the water running down my drive 40-50’ before running south. I have an easement 30 ft wide X about 200 ft to the county road. The creek has another dogleg to the east just after my easement. That property owners has told me that I can have the area dredged to help with the flow.
Thanks for commenting.
 
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#25  
If the upstream creek runs thru a wooded area, it's just a matter of time until culverts are blocked by sticks, then leaves, during a gully-washer.
That’s another reason why I am willing to use a 3ft culvert instead of a 2ft. I can keep a 3ft cleaned out better than a 2ft.
Thanks for commenting.
 
   / DIY Bridge #26  
It looks like you are crossing it at an angle... is that correct? Can you go upstream or downstream to find a narrower place with higher banks to cross? It may cost a bit more to move the road but it is the only access to your home, after all.

We build a lot of bridges using concrete waste blocks for embankments; simply poured blocks, 2x2 feet by 4 or six feet wide. They also are stackable if you want to go higher. That gives you something solid to build on. We often use wooden mats to cross them, made of 16 foot long 12'x12" timbers bolted together.

Looking at your pictures, any culvert is just going to wash out... personally I hate doing a job twice.
 
   / DIY Bridge
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#27  
Is a bridge not an option? Pretty easy to engineer and build a 10-12' span that can hold concrete trucks and heavier. The cross sectional area for water flow under such a bridge would be immensely more than your listed culverts.
I don’t know what sort of materials I would need to make a bridge. Know nothing about the strength of concrete when it comes to spanning any distances. I agree the an open channel will flow better than a low water crossing with culverts.
Thanks for commenting.
 
   / DIY Bridge
  • Thread Starter
#28  
It looks like you are crossing it at an angle... is that correct? Can you go upstream or downstream to find a narrower place with higher banks to cross? It may cost a bit more to move the road but it is the only access to your home, after all.

We build a lot of bridges using concrete waste blocks for embankments; simply poured blocks, 2x2 feet by 4 or six feet wide. They also are stackable if you want to go higher. That gives you something solid to build on. We often use wooden mats to cross them, made of 16 foot long 12'x12" timbers bolted together.

Looking at your pictures, any culvert is just going to wash out... personally I hate doing a job twice.
I hate doing things twice myself, especially when there’s money involved. Those culverts aren’t cheap. I’m too old and out of shape to enjoy the exercise I’d get.
The water does turn at my drive. I know the first thing I’ll need to do is have the creek bed dredged out & straightened to help with the flow& possibly use some rip rap to shore up the banks.
Thanks for commenting.
 
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#29  
If you put in to large of culverts, you wasted $500*... If they are too small, them you buy bigger ones and start over and see $5000* washed away. Go big the 1st time.

* not real numbers.
24”X20’ culvert cost $550.00ea
36”X20’ culvert cost$1300.00 ea
Nothing’s cheap or affordable,
 
   / DIY Bridge #30  
Bridge construction isn’t cheap and nature is unforgiving.

See used steel logging bridges for creeks. Keeping out of water a bigger deal now. They even provide installation if you need. Quick, substantial but $$$
 
 
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