Formal Training?

sunandsand

Silver Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2020
Messages
104
Tractor
Kubota B2601
The comments tell me that there is a need for proper training to use tractors and attachments.

It appears that many of us have learned by doing, by asking around, and on YouTube (which is hardly an authoritative source).

This may be why there are tractor accidents - often you don't realize you've done something wrong until it is too late. "Common sense" helps, but is no guarantee for ALL situations.

Point of fact, tractor accidents happen, they are not that rare, people get hurt or killed. Often they are kids who aren't adult enough to have developed "common sense", and some adults never develop it either.

ROPS and PTO guards help, but if the primary resource for tractor safety is an internet support group (this one), that tells me something is wrong.

I am not advocating licenses and permits, we have enough of that already. What I am advocating is something like a book "Safe Tractor Operation for Dummies", and this book should go with each and every sale of a tractor ESPECIALLY to people like me, who suddenly found out that I needed a tractor and knew zilch about them. Ask me about my specialties, airplanes, electronics, wristwatches, and I can give you a coherent answer. Two years ago I knew nothing at all about tractors other than yes, I knew there was such a thing - but that's it.

I *think* I've learned some of the basics - don't try to use the FEL as a bulldozer, go slow, go in with 2WD so if you get stuck you can go to 4WD and (probably) get unstuck, carry loads in the bucket LOW and keep the bucket as low as possible all the time, keep the mower blades sharp, lubricate everything you can find (even if it isn't in the manual), don't pull from above the rear axle, crank up the revs, NO RIDERS, EVER, let it cool down before refueling and RTFM (read the flippin' manual)!!!!. There's much, much more.

The problem with "learn by doing" is simply this - sometimes you may get a lesson which is harmful or fatal, and if you are dead, that lesson won't do you any good at all.

This is why there are books. Personally, I like learning from the mistakes of others, it is much less painful for me, it is free, and discouragingly, there seems to be SO much teaching material available.

Lets write it down - even the pros can learn something from it. I always remember that the larger the island of knowledge, the longer the shoreline of ignorance.

Best Regards,

Mike/Florida
 

Williy

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Apr 26, 2020
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Texas
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Yanmar YT 235C Yannar YRC 60 rotary cutter, Yanmar RT72 rotary tiller B75 Backhoe & bucket & thumb

OzarkChris

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Dec 26, 2020
Messages
91
Location
Calamine AR
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Mahindra 2555 Shuttle Cab
I really do understand sunandsand's issue and feel for his inexperience; however, if the schools in the bigger cities would even consider allowing FFA, 4-H, Boy scouts (I promise I left my boy scout soap box at home, along with my eagle), etc. I believe we would probably have fewer gang related issues (because there would be other places for kids to go), which should help with crime, assaults, (and maybe even) drug crimes, etc. By increasingly teaching "how bad America is", encouraging racism (by teaching white privilege, etc), and totally forgetting about good citizenship & civics, as a country, we are doing our younger generations a real disservice. Even if this started today, I don't believe I'd ever see the complete benefit before I die, but would hope to see some improvement in all fronts. I'm pretty sure it would take 3 or more generations of training to actually turn these "current" trends around.

Just the ramblings of a younger, "old guy".

Getting back to the subject, my grandfather once told me as he was teaching me "tractor stuff", that you really haven't completely learned about tractors, or become a good operator until you've laid one on its side & walked away - of course, he was referring to his tricycle gear farmall M which would go over if you just looked at it wrong. Not sure I'd continue to pass that along today, but I guess if he was right, I must be a pretty good tractor driver. 🙃😉🙂
 

ljjhouser

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Oct 25, 2018
Messages
515
Location
Midwest
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Kubota L4701
Ozark Chris

Getting back to the subject, my grandfather once told me as he was teaching me "tractor stuff", that you really haven't completely learned about tractors, or become a good operator until you've laid one on its side & walked away - of course, he was referring to his tricycle gear farmall M which would go over if you just looked at it wrong. Not sure I'd continue to pass that along today, but I guess if he was right, I must be a pretty good tractor driver.


Sounds somewhat familiar - When my wife and i were paddling a lot of southeast whitewater rivers, we got instruction from national champion paddlers - solo open canoe. We were often told - you haven't learned to paddle unless you have learned to crash and swim the river. Of course, not such good advice on a tractor. Seems we have to keep "flirting" with the edge of safety sometimes. Best Wishes, Larry
 
   #85  

mkendrix

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Joined
Aug 24, 2012
Messages
3
Location
cassopolis, mi
Tractor
ford/8n
I was a city slicker when I grew up. I took a tractor safety course when I was a teenager (70’s) that was offered through the local 4-H. Most of the tractor driving was in reverse with a trailer which taught me more useful skills. Now I own a small farm and am looking for a NEW tractor to replace my 2 older than me tractors. Wish I could find a program to teach my kids what I learned all those years ago.
 
   #86  

Jchonline

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Feb 19, 2018
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Red Feather Lakes, CO
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Kubota M62, M7060, X1100C
Just last month my daughter,sil and me had a conversation about the need for vocational training in public school. Today's society turn their nose up at the suggestion their kid might need a trade. In typical fashion they completly overlook the value of work ethic learned at an early age. When they were in school vocational was a 3 hour elective,1 hour classroom and 2 hours working for wages. The class wasn't broken down into specialties,classroom was checkbook management,creating resume,job seeking skills (boy there's one a bunch of people could use) managing time between education,hobbies and family. Other 2 hours could be ANY JOB where employer was willing to perticipate. SIL worked at an auto parts house,daughter at a custom bakery and a pharmacy who eventually hired their son while he was in high school. While working part time and attending college,one of the pharmacists approached him about going to work for a start up business. Today at 32 years old he is full partner in a growing multi-million dollar pharmaceutical company.
Getting back closer to what OP is talking about, this kind of education is healthy for the community and tax payers should push for them. This is far above my pay grade but many of you qualify as adjunct professors. Point being that a bookkeepers and a host of other occupations could occasionally teach classes which save's institution money making classes affordable when compared to full time staff with benefits.

So so funny. I was just perusing a reddit site on the woes of the unemployment benefits running out and a bunch of whining babies mad because they have crap jobs. Its always someone else’s fault…..blah blah. Socialist nonsense, but this stuff is important because it is the way the younger generation (not everyone but a portion) look at the world. The only good posts were those in favor of folks taking up skilled labor jobs.
 
   #87  

npalen

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Nov 17, 2009
Messages
2,527
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Beloit, KS
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Kubota B9200 HSTD and Mahindra 3015
I learned to drive and operate mostly by riding and observing back in the '50's. First job was plowing with the D2 CAT tugging a 3-16 moldboard plow. Broke my heart when Dad said it was time to quit for the day.
 
   #88  

/pine

Super Star Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2009
Messages
13,192
When it comes to personal injuries or death etc. involving anything with moving parts etc...
Stupidity, carelessness, apathy...by individuals cost us all money...we all end up paying a percentage...

Through retail costs we pay all the lawyers who write all the boilerplate liability nomenclature for all the products manufactured...

We pay for all the studies etc. that determine and then apply all the warning stickers and labels...

We pay for all the safety literature that gets included with everything these days...(the instructions may be one short paragraph...but the safety book will have 10K words...and warning emblems)...all add to the cost of a product...

BTW...most people don't even ever look at the safety literature...a lot disable safety switches and mechanisms or structures...many of which were put in place after the fact that operators would not heed written warnings in the safety literature causing injuries and lawsuits etc...

And then there's the fact that if there were fewer accidental injury claims insurance companies would not be able to justify such high cost of coverage...
 
   #89  

k0ua

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Jun 28, 2009
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30,601
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Branson, Mo.
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Kioti DK35se Hydrostat
I went to college with my 30-30 in the rear window of my pickup truck. Try that today
Just about everyone that drove a car or truck to my rural area school had a firearm or two in them. 30-30 .222 (for groundhogs) 12 gauge or 22LR. Yes lots of firearms at high school "back in the day".

I learned how to type there, but no very well. Later in life I got into amateur radio and I liked working Radio Teletype. so I increased my typing skill from about 40 wpm to now I can do about 100.
 
   #90  

k0ua

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30,601
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Branson, Mo.
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Kioti DK35se Hydrostat
Well,, times have changed. Back in the 70s you couldn't open carry a handgun and now you can in many places.

Still can't open carry a 40 here, though.

View attachment 711392
Interesting side note. in 1970 my home town had its 100 year celebration. My brother and I dressed up in 1870 garb and wanted to include our revolvers in our holsters. We had to get permission from the police chief to do so. It drew a lot of looks and Stuart Symington who was in the parade called out "hey look at those hawg-legs!" as he passed by.

Of course now we can carry open or concealed without permit for either. Firearms laws are one of the few things we have obtained more freedom. I might point out, we likely need to carry firearms now a lot more than we did back then.

People all carried long guns back then in their vehicles, but the intent was for hunting. Handguns were sometimes frowned on then. We all had them, but you could not legally carry one on your person. You could transport one in your vehicle, but it had to be out in the open. Of course that didn't make much sense. Most firearms laws don't. Long guns are for the most part far more powerful than handguns.
 
 
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