pickup truck size

Ed Weber

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
46
Location
Wilton, CA
Tractor
MF 1635
To me, today's trucks are glorified cars with no cargo room.
Them made the truck bigger, added all the creature comforts, shrunk the bed from 8" to about 5.5" and raised the price. All so they could add a backseat and doors to make it the family car that gets poor MPG.
 

RollingsFarms

Veteran Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2007
Messages
2,300
Location
South Carolina
Tractor
Few John Deere's and one Ford 3600 diesel.
I recently bought a 2021 F150 that had a sticker price of $46790. My 2018 Silverado I had was $48000. The funny thing is the F-150 has a higher payload than the older more expensive truck by about 200lbs, gets better gas mileage, and has some features my older one didn’t have. I know you can find the $60,000-80,000 trucks all day long but I honestly got a nice truck that had everything I wanted with even some bonus features (center console, vinyl floors, 2kw power in the bed) for a what I’d say is a decent price. If you stay under the $50,000 msrp you can still get a nice truck for the money if you equip it right and don’t get gadget crazy. Mine still has an 8” screen with nav and satellite radio and I was still under 50,000.
 

oakhilltop

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
1
Location
New Hampshire
Tractor
Airens 18GT
I've often wondered in recent years how is it that American (& foreign) full size pick up trucks have become so large, luxury laden, and overwhelmingly expensive almost requiring a 2nd mortgage to purchase. (i'm not talking about those who make a living from their pickups, just everyday owners who cruise the country, malls, & trips to Lowes...)

What is your take? this is observation only, we all have our preferences. I'm talking sheer size & price. I travel narrow dirt roads almost daily, & drive very defensively around blind curves knowing most current pickups almost aggressively consume 2/3 or more of the road while insulated with power & luxury. That's ok, but puts me at risk. Most of the time i just pull off to the side...

So has it been the result of 1) modern owners actually needing all if it? 2) or is it Americans love affair with bigger, better, & more technology laden? I also note that the size of the payload bed continues to shrink all the while. (some 4 full size door models can't even carry a sheet of ply)
Personally i feel both are true: we now use pickups for in a wider range of activities, & want having it packed into one large size. But dang, the price & size
Hey, just as a simple metaphor to compare: look at the vat sized drink tumblers now served @ fast foods. do we really need it?

On the flip side, i've also noticed that especially since '08 crash, Detroit has done an outstanding job of producing more fuel efficient & modest sized passenger vehicles...strange. So tell me about the big pickup truck size craze. Again, not dumping, just observing.
Apologize in advance if this seems like an inane post, but i'm blown away every day of what the full size pickup has now become. best regards
You don't need a truck that can tow 20,000 tons up a ramp with fire burning all around it? Do you ever have to tow a space shuttle? How do you carry a couple of 2x4's from the store without that power.

Make sure you keep it sparkling clean and avoid dirt at all cost.
 

pacosperson

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
17
Location
Southern Pa.
Tractor
Ford 1210
I've often wondered in recent years how is it that American (& foreign) full size pick up trucks have become so large, luxury laden, and overwhelmingly expensive almost requiring a 2nd mortgage to purchase. (i'm not talking about those who make a living from their pickups, just everyday owners who cruise the country, malls, & trips to Lowes...)

What is your take? this is observation only, we all have our preferences. I'm talking sheer size & price. I travel narrow dirt roads almost daily, & drive very defensively around blind curves knowing most current pickups almost aggressively consume 2/3 or more of the road while insulated with power & luxury. That's ok, but puts me at risk. Most of the time i just pull off to the side...

So has it been the result of 1) modern owners actually needing all if it? 2) or is it Americans love affair with bigger, better, & more technology laden? I also note that the size of the payload bed continues to shrink all the while. (some 4 full size door models can't even carry a sheet of ply)
Personally i feel both are true: we now use pickups for in a wider range of activities, & want having it packed into one large size. But dang, the price & size
Hey, just as a simple metaphor to compare: look at the vat sized drink tumblers now served @ fast foods. do we really need it?

On the flip side, i've also noticed that especially since '08 crash, Detroit has done an outstanding job of producing more fuel efficient & modest sized passenger vehicles...strange. So tell me about the big pickup truck size craze. Again, not dumping, just observing.
Apologize in advance if this seems like an inane post, but i'm blown away every day of what the full size pickup has now become. best regards
It's marketing and profit, nothing more.
You can still buy little pickups in Mexico and South America. The makers KNOW Americas want them but do not offer them in order to sell $45,000 baseline 'trucks'. It is impossible to simply order a 'heavy duty radiator'. Now it comes as part of a package with other stuff you would never order and a huge price tag. 'It's what we sell. If you want it; pay up'. ALL pickups used to have recessed or otherwise protected taillight lenses. They lived in a tough environment and were subject to breakage. (They were generally 'flat'. Change them with two screws) Now they are garish wraparound expensive targets for every branch and twig. Yes, they are expensive.
This is why the price of used pickups keeps increasing. People know what they want. And the manufacturers are not offering it.
 

jjeff

Silver Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
183
Location
MI
Tractor
kubota l2850, kubota l4150
Jeff,

That's why I still drive my 1995 Dodge Ram 2500 12V Diesel. 1, I can't get a truck with a manual transmission anymore and 2, I don't need a 4 door truck with a 4-1/2' bed. Now a truck with a full 8' bed is as long as a small school bus. Hoping my '95 will last!
Does Dodge still make manuals for there trucks I used to enjoy manuals every taco I owned had a 5speed useless for towing and hauling anything in the bed though? I can comfortably squeeze three kids in the double cab, unfortunately next one may have to be the crew cab, wife calls it a freight train.
 

michaelegan

New member
Joined
May 22, 2013
Messages
1
Location
rosco, il
Tractor
takeuchi tl130
I think what you're getting at is the shift away from the 1960s "longbed" pickups which were a full 8ft by a bit more than 4ft between the wheel wells so you could fit plywood (no OSB then) in with the tailgate closed. We were different then: not so rich, not so fat, not so addicted to big gulps, latte fraps, designer beers, although cigarrettes killed quite a few back then. Now we want cup holders, gps, surround stereo and Siri to make us feel right. Go to any "poor" country and you'll see variations of how we used to be: bicycles with trailers, 90cc motorcycles hauling huge amounts of freight (and entire families), people walking. The old days weren't easy but you could work on your own vehicles and they did more work than today's fancy ones.
 

Oaktree

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
2,635
Location
Coös, N.H.
Tractor
Kioti LK3054xs
Truth is, the overwhelming majority of truck buyers DO WANT their trucks bigger, more HP, more passenger room, less cargo room, more bells, more whistles, higher lift, bigger tires, less accessible bed, etc. and that's why trucks have evolved into what they are. "You can't rape the willing" as some say. The market delivers what consumers demand (as determined by what they buy). The manufacturers couldn't have done this to us against our will. If they could, we would all be driving Chevy Avalanches.
True to an extent, but most people will only buy what the dealer has on their lot. Very few will special order, and even then there are generally only a handful of packages available. In order to get xxx desirable feature you want you have to get the upgraded package with lots of stuff you don't. Of course the higher trim levels mean more profit for the dealer, so guess what they mostly have in stock? Long gone are the days when you could special order a vehicle the way you want it.

Not sure the point you were trying to make on the Avalanche. Everyone I've known who had one liked it.
Once people figured out how awesome it was to sit up high versus dragging your rear end on the ground where you can't see anything, the utility of the pickup became a no-brainer for many. Today the manufacturers are simply making them with the same luxury and tech options you could always get on sedans. And honestly, the weekend warrior types don't need an 8 foot bed because all they're hauling is bicycles and fertilizer. Those types largely weren't buying trucks 30-40 years ago but they're most definitely the majority of the market now which is why the shorter beds are so common.
As huge as full sized trucks are today, could you imagine a 4 door one with an 8' bed? I recall seeing a few when they were still made 30+ years ago, they took up 2 parking places they were so long.
Looking into it, the Tacoma is pretty much the same dimensions as a 90's C-10 GMC. Length Width and height. Big difference is there are no "cab only" models.

It's either Access cab and a 6 foot bed, or dual cab and a 5 foot bed. Gone are the 8 foot beds ....
Are you sure the beds are that long? The 4 door tacomas I've seen look like the bed is closer to 3'. Short enough to be almost useless IMHO.
 

Pleease

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2017
Messages
25
Location
Erlanger, KY
Tractor
Kubota BX1880
Hey now, my Ridgeline is comfortable and not as large as an F150, Silverado, RAM, Tundra, etc., but it's hardly a "trucklet", lol. Kidding aside, it has payload capacity near 1500#, can carry a 4x8 sheet lying flat in the bed, and tows up to 5000#. Not a 1:1 substitute for a body-on-frame vehicle - especially for towing - but just what many consumers need, myself included, obviously.

Pickups have generally grown in size, as posted. A guy in a Ridgeline group posted this size comparison of three trucks he has owned - a recent Ridgeline, 2000 GMC Sierra 1/2 ton, 1976 Chevy Scottsdale 1/2 ton - which I found pretty illuminating. Would be interesting to see some 2021-era models tacked onto this table - bet many are much bigger.


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