Running Generators in Parallel?

   #1  

Tractorable

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I own an 8 acre property. The property has two houses on it, the main house and a guest house. The guest house is operated as an AirBnB so we sometimes have guests staying there.

We recently had a power outage that lasted for three days due to a wind storm. I would like to find a solution to have backup power available to both houses on the property in case of power outages.

There's an electrical panel with a meter at the corner of the property about 75 yards away that feeds power to both houses on the property. Each house has its own electrical panel inside.

I'm wondering, would it be best to buy one big generator and connect it to the main panel outside to power both homes? or buy two generators, one for each home? If I bought two identical generators, is it possible to run them in parallel to provide double the juice to one home?

Additionally, whatever generator I buy, I'd like it to be powerful enough to run a Millermatic 211 MIG welder. I'm currently considering buying two Westinghouse WGen7500 continuous/9500 surge dual fuel generators.

A standby diesel generator with concrete pad is not in the cards financially.
 
   #2  

bcp

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If I bought two identical generators, is it possible to run them in parallel to provide double the juice to one home?

Only if they are intended by the manufacturer to be hooked in parallel. Otherwise there is a long list of things that can go wrong.

Bruce
 
   #3  

aczlan

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Only if they are intended by the manufacturer to be hooked in parallel. Otherwise there is a long list of things that can go wrong.

Bruce
Yep. The only ones that are commercially available which can be paralleled are the inverter generators. I think that some of those are available with 240 volt power, but you'd have to look.

Aaron Z
 
   #5  

RNeumann

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I reread your post and you could pull off one generator by tying in down near the meter. You would need at least a manual transfer switch and some rewiring to do it right.

And a gen that will run that Miller will need to have 240v and prob 20-30a (at 240v). Generator specs are notorious for quoting 120v amp specs while almost everything from the panel back to the utility and 240v circuits are quoted/spec at 240v.
 
   #6  

Industrial Toys

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Many conventional generators can be synced together. It has nothing to do with inverter types.

Basically you stick a meter in between the two, and when they are in snyc, the voltage goes to zero, you connect them together and if fairly closely matched, they will stay in sync.

That's the easy explanation. But like someone said, things can go wrong. It's more for larger systems.

There are a lot of military surplus generators on E-Bay at a very good price. No one says you have to go buy the larger 3600rpm (not worth the money) consumer garbage that's out there.
 
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   #7  

sandman2234

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One big generator for the two houses is less maintenance for you, but more costly. Two smaller won't usually run together, but if one craps out, you can still keep freezers going, one at a time. Since you have a tractor, have you considered a larger pto generator?
David from jax
 
   #8  

Navvet

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I am in a similar situation and I don't like having a generator too close to the house (noise) ....

I settled on a PTO driven 16KW generator from Harbor Freight Search results for: 'pto generator'

Gives a steady 60A at 240v all day long.

Requires a 30 (PTO) HP tractor to drive it and has several added advantages;

1) Generator engines never get run until you need them, this uses your tractor for power.

2) Power where you need it, I can bring my Lincoln stick welder out in the field for repairs.

3) Easy hookup and easy storage.

4) Don't need extra fuel just for the generator.

All in all, a great solution for me.
 
   #9  

Industrial Toys

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Better than a portable or one of those lawn mowers in a can, and most certainly better than nothing but I got tired of the PTO. You never know how long the outage, and with the PTO, I always hesitated going through the motions, maybe for nothing.

Also, you really need to periodically warm up the windings of a generator to keep out moisture, so really any attached engine would get exercise and be ready for service. You hope.

My old Onan 15KW PTO set

DSC00043.JPG
 

newbury

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I own an 8 acre property. The property has two houses on it, the main house and a guest house. The guest house is operated as an AirBnB so we sometimes have guests staying there.

We recently had a power outage that lasted for three days due to a wind storm. I would like to find a solution to have backup power available to both houses on the property in case of power outages.

There's an electrical panel with a meter at the corner of the property about 75 yards away that feeds power to both houses on the property. Each house has its own electrical panel inside.

I'm wondering, would it be best to buy one big generator and connect it to the main panel outside to power both homes? or buy two generators, one for each home? If I bought two identical generators, is it possible to run them in parallel to provide double the juice to one home?

Additionally, whatever generator I buy, I'd like it to be powerful enough to run a Millermatic 211 MIG welder. I'm currently considering buying two Westinghouse WGen7500 continuous/9500 surge dual fuel generators.

A standby diesel generator with concrete pad is not in the cards financially.

This may not answer your question - BUT - most of the easily paralleled generators are under 3KW and inverters and cost a fair bit more.
You might get by with a pair of HF 3.5KW which are on sale for $750, but probably most people will dump on those and tell you to get a pair of Honda EU3000's for $4,000.

The pair should be enough to run your welder.

Now if you need more power there is a 10KW generator that undergoes yo-yo pricing. It's the Duromax 10000 watt dual fuel . Right now it's price is at $1,199 :eek: . BUT it often cycles down to below $650, once to $550. I do not understand their pricing schema but I've been following them for 3 years since I bought one based on this thread. The price will drop down to the $650 or less level and they sell out. Several threads here about using them with welders.

A pair of inverter generators can be separated and used at different sites.

/edit -
Of course if you REALLY want to do it right get a pair of Honda EU7000IS's and a parallel kit for about $8K.
 
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