The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"

   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#21  
Looks like a 5610 or 6610. I’ve rebuilt a few and yes they will smoke for a period of time until the rings sear, but I have the same question as CliffordK, was it bored? Block picture shows cylinders in rough shape.

Were the valve guides renewed? Perhaps sucking oil past valves causing oil blubbering.

16 psi is about the low end at 8-900 rpm for oil pressure.

Good move on adding the thermostat. If it doesn’t get temp, the fuel won’t burn right and the engine will not break-in.

Also agree that additives are not necessary.
I added all the information that was done in the original post...Sorry for not including it from the begining.

The valve guide were done. It has a new radiator and water pump. I was surprised how low the temperature stayed. I actually added a high temperature alarm (235f), an electric fan to the radiator and hydraulic fluid cooler that is on a switch. Florida heat is brutal in the summer,
 

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   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#22  
I've never seen a properly rebuilt engine burn oil like that before.


I'd call bs on that one for sure.


New rod and main bearings? Oil pump?
I added the information to the original post. Yes both are new

thanks
 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#23  
I think that sounds like what one would mostly expect for a rebuild.



I have an older Deere that belches oil all over the place, and the oil can go down quickly.

Perhaps the shop's advice is best. Keep an eye on the temperature and oil pressure, and just run the tractor for a while.
I hope you are right. Thanks
 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work" #24  
Ol Smokey
Well if they lubed everything up on assembly it could smoke for a bit, but after an hours run time the smoke should be gone.
Chrome top rings can take some time to seat (Big fan of molly channel with Chrome rail compression rings)
Oil pressure seams Low for a Ford tractor engine both my high hour 3 cylinders had 60 psi cold and at least forty at 600 RPM idle hot.

Did you check ring gaps and piston to bore clearance before assembly?

edit:
I Hope the valve seats were machine ground as well
Putting New Valves and guides in an old head with worn seats is a Big no no, especially since the new guides and valves will change where the valve head tries to seat concentric to the valve stem and this can cause a LOT of blue smoke and oil (unburned diesel) running out especially if it is a diesel because it will never reach combustion efficiency since some of the combustion gasses will leak past both intake and exhaust valves during the combustion stroke.

The oil pressure is concerning as well.

How many hours run time total since rebuild now?
 
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   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#25  
Also breaking in an engine goes not mean taking it easy on the engine. It means warming it up slowly and cooling it off slowly under a moderate to a heavier load at first, say for half an hour. Then onto a more full load. The engine needs to work to seat the rings.

I agree with you on the thermostat. I would also hang a garbage bag over the grill and adjust that as you're working the engine to keep the engine temperatures well into operating range. That means you are the thermostat and you need to keep an eye on the temperature gauge.

I used to rebuild pumping units for irrigation. We would warm them up for a few minutes and then apply the load. There is no such thing as a partial load running a center pivot. It was kind of neat to watch. You could slowly over half an hour give less throttle as the engine broke in. After a day change the oil and put it to work for the season.
 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#26  
Thanks I will keep that in mind.
 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work"
  • Thread Starter
#27  
Well if they lubed everything up on assembly it could smoke for a bit, but after an hours run time the smoke should be gone.
Chrome top rings can take some time to seat (Big fan of molly channel with Chrome rail compression rings)
Oil pressure seams Low for a Ford tractor engine both my high hour 3 cylinders had 60 psi cold and at least forty at 600 RPM idle hot.

Did you check ring gaps and piston to bore clearance before assembly?

How many hours run time total since rebuild now?
He did not check all of them. He put clevite on everything. I saw him check one ring only. I think he was trusting the machine shop that it was OK. Good catch. 45 Minutes run time. Thanks
 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work" #28  
I added all the information that was done in the original post...Sorry for not including it from the begining.

The valve guide were done. It has a new radiator and water pump. I was surprised how low the temperature stayed. I actually added a high temperature alarm (235f), an electric fan to the radiator and hydraulic fluid cooler that is on a switch. Florida heat is brutal in the summer,
Southwest desert heat is a problem, although dry. We rebuilt and ran many tractors without the extra fans, etc. without any problem. 180 deg thermostat and standard fans were the norm. Many, many 56, 66 and 7600s and 10s running in the Coachella Valley without professionally minded drivers or owners. Not saying that your fans won't help, just not real necessary.

On another note, the Ford 7610 and 8010 high clearance mudder tractors suffered oil blubbering from running at idle most of the time, even after break-in. As previously pointed out, the chrome rings take awhile to seat.

 
   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work" #29  
Op I edited my post .

Do you know if the valve seats were ground ? and by ground I do not mean just hand lapped.
Hand lapping will not restore concentricity for a new valve and guide installation. the valve seats HAVE to be reground

A suggestion if after firing up the engine and warming to operating temperature and running under load smell the smoky exhaust, if it smells like un burned diesel my money is on a bad seal on all of the valve / seat assemblies, if it smells of burned engine oil instead well more digging is required.
Did the engine smoke this bad before it was torn down originally?
 
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   / The guy that put the engine internals together says "The rings are not seated yet end the smoking is normal. Just give it a couple hours of work" #30  
One test that you can do is to do a compression test on each cylinder.

Do you have glow plugs? That would make it easy to do.
 
 
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