Wire Fence unroller, does it exist?

raptorterry

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A good fence should be horse high, bull strong and hog tight—and for goats, water tight as well. Coyotes, being a dog, are going to be pretty Wiley.
 

oosik

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Eddie - I don't want to be a turd in your oatmeal but - you don't expect a four foot high mesh fence to stop a coyote, do you? I've witnessed several climb right up and over an eight foot high deer fence. The deer fence was HD 4" mesh.
 

QRTRHRS

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For tensioning woven wire, you can buy those two piece clamps from TSC or Kencove or you can what I do for cheap. Two 2x4's screwed together squeezing the wire with eye bolts or something to pull on. Quick enough to secure with an impact driver and better than one more one time tool sitting in the shed.
 
  
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EddieWalker

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Are you not wanting one that attaches to a 3 point because of the price or you dont have a tractor? I, myself, have a bad back and if I can get my machine to do most of the heavy work, I'll go that route.

I like to keep my bush hog attached to my tractor. If I was doing all the fence at once, then the 3 point option makes sense to me, but I'm going to do three rolls fairly soon, and then the rest of the land as time allows, which means a roll or two one weekend, then maybe nothing for another month or two, or maybe more fencing the following weekend. I don't want to be attaching and attaching stuff from my tractor.
 
  
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EddieWalker

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I'd be wondering about pulling that weight and keeping the fence roll tight enough. Do you have anything else to pull a small trailer with? LT, GT, ATV, etc.? If so, you might be able to adapt a small, low trailer like a two wheel car towing dolly.

In the past I've used a hand truck to get the wire where I want it. I was thinking that if I had something with a pole in the middle of the wire to keep it in place, that would be even better.

I'm also considering a dedicated trailer that I can pull it behind my Mule or even my truck. I saw a few that people have built and it looks simple enough.

Another options is to buy a quick attach plate and weld up something that will do all the lifting, and then drive backwards to unroll it.
 
  
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EddieWalker

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Eddie - I don't want to be a turd in your oatmeal but - you don't expect a four foot high mesh fence to stop a coyote, do you? I've witnessed several climb right up and over an eight foot high deer fence. The deer fence was HD 4" mesh.

No fence is 100%, but where I have existing fence, I don't have anything dying. It's this area between my house, my fenced in pasture and the chicken coop that is wide open that I want to close off. If the problem continues after the fence is built, I'll had a hot wire. I've seen how good that works. It's very satisfying seeing a coyote get zapped and scream as it runs away.
 

Kyle_in_Tex

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Sorry about your chickens. We let ours free range during the day, and we have lost some to dogs and I believe to an owl. The chickens' coop is inside a covered, 10 x 10 dog kennel. They will migrate into the kennel at dusk, and we go close the gate to the kennel. 30 minutes later they'll be in the coop and we go close the doors on that. I built it with no cracks bigger than 1/8" to keep out snakes, but the snakes go in there during the day to get the eggs. Also have to watch out for hawks.
 
  
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EddieWalker

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19238252_10213682552600784_8867330840528972065_o.jpg

This is one of my coops. I also built it from a dog kennel, and then added 1/4 inch wire mesh to keep out snakes and dug out a footing all around it for concrete so nothing can dig under it. Chickens are safe at night. The problem coyote started a few weeks ago. I've seen him twice, but not long enough for a shot, he's just too quick for me. My wife has seen him three times and she keeps her deer rifle on our kitchen counter so it's right there the next time she sees it. We're finding the feather piles along the trees at the edge of the yard. My guess is that it sits there during the day and waits for one to come close enough to get it. The times that we've seen it have been between 8 am and 2 pm.

Eventually it will die, but we've lost at least a dozen chickens to it so far, including a few that my wife really liked. We hatched 110 last spring and will do the same again next year, give or take a few. We feed our dogs a dozen eggs a day. Owls and hawks get a few, and others wonder off so far away that we don't really feel sorry for them if they get eaten. It's the ones in the yard that we want to keep safe.

That is the reasoning for the immediate section of fencing. Overall, I will fence in about 20 acres and double the amount of land the horses and goats have to feed in. That is the ultimate goal.
 

quicksandfarmer

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In the past I've used a hand truck to get the wire where I want it. I was thinking that if I had something with a pole in the middle of the wire to keep it in place, that would be even better.

I'm also considering a dedicated trailer that I can pull it behind my Mule or even my truck. I saw a few that people have built and it looks simple enough.

Another options is to buy a quick attach plate and weld up something that will do all the lifting, and then drive backwards to unroll it.

I hadn't thought about a hand truck but I think that's on the right track. Just need to figure out a way to put a rod through the roll so it can unroll without being pulled off the cart. The way the Tarter unroller works is there is a hole in the bottom plate and a bracket on the top. You put the roll onto the bottom plate, then drop the rod through the top bracket, the roll, and into the bottom hole.

The question is whether it will unroll with a reasonable amount of effort. The rod not being vertical when you tilt it back may be a problem.
 
 
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