6.0 Power Stroke Questions

   #31  

Scott65

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And btw, to FTG-05, and anyone else regarding anti-freeze. In your pic it looks like possibly dexcool? Or maybe just the camera or something changing its appearance? You never want to stray from the Ford Gold antifreeze. Allot of people skimp and put green or orange to save a few bucks. I'm sure there are some other formulations that may be the same, I'm no chemist. Like maybe the Dodge equivalent (Hoat G05), but I'm not sure, I just always use Ford Gold. If you would like, I can explain why. Or I can mind my own business, lol. Just an observation, but it CAN cause major damage over time
 
   #32  

mikehaugen

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And btw, to FTG-05, and anyone else regarding anti-freeze. In your pic it looks like possibly dexcool? Or maybe just the camera or something changing its appearance? You never want to stray from the Ford Gold antifreeze. Allot of people skimp and put green or orange to save a few bucks. I'm sure there are some other formulations that may be the same, I'm no chemist. Like maybe the Dodge equivalent (Hoat G05), but I'm not sure, I just always use Ford Gold. If you would like, I can explain why. Or I can mind my own business, lol. Just an observation, but it CAN cause major damage over time

I say explain away...
 
   #34  

Scott65

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Ok, I'll try not to ramble. On an old vehicle, you can put pretty much whatever you want in it. As long as you flush it out. You have a 98 chevy pickup, you want to put green in it to save a few bucks? Fine, but flush it good first. If you mix it with the factory dexcool, in a few months you will have what looks like chocolate pudding, and reduced coolant flow. Newer cars, not a good idea. If your new lexus calls for something specific, put it in there, even if its $100 a gallon. Because that $100 a gallon is probably the only thing that doesn't act like acid to a $1000 nasa space age metal alloy radiator or intake. It may look like plain ole aluminum, but don't bet on it.

So for that reason, you don't do it in a diesel either. 6.4's for example, have a habit of cavitating and eating out the front timing cover and dumping the coolant into the oil if the wrong coolant is used. Bad deal.

But on a diesel, the main reason is far more destructive. A diesel is a high compression motor. If you look at the last picture in FTG's post, you can see the rings around the tops of the cylinders. There are sleeves that go down through the block forming the cylinders, and surrounding the cylinders is the coolant. When the piston goes down, the turbo fills the cylinder full of air, the piston comes up, it compresses it as tight as it can. If its tight enough to stretch the headbolts (which is why you get blown head gaskets), its tight enough to "bulge" these sleeves. When the sleeves bulge out, it pushes the coolant out with it. When the piston goes back down and the valve opens, the sleeve relaxes. The problem that was occurring was the aftermarket coolant couldn't keep up. It was forming tiny bubbles, if you will. When the next cycle came around, the bubbles would pop, and the coolant would implode back against the sleeve. Over time this pressure washing effect would eat its way all the way through the sleeves and into the cylinders. Game over. The manufacturer specific antifreezes are formulated to "stick" to the sides of the cylinders to prevent this from happening.

I'm sure scientifically there are many other reasons, but these are the main, real world reasons for not doing so. Its just not worth the few pennies you save. I know that people do it all the time, and most of the time, it goes unnoticed. But all it takes is once. And if your the unlucky one, all of a sudden, its *$#&@ FORD! And its not necessarily Ford's fault
 
   #35  

FTG-05

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And btw, to FTG-05, and anyone else regarding anti-freeze. In your pic it looks like possibly dexcool? Or maybe just the camera or something changing its appearance? You never want to stray from the Ford Gold antifreeze. Allot of people skimp and put green or orange to save a few bucks. I'm sure there are some other formulations that may be the same, I'm no chemist. Like maybe the Dodge equivalent (Hoat G05), but I'm not sure, I just always use Ford Gold. If you would like, I can explain why. Or I can mind my own business, lol. Just an observation, but it CAN cause major damage over time

I don't know how you could come to any conclusions about what antifreeze I use from my three pics, but whatever.

I replaced the Ford coolant at 40K miles when I found out that I had the wrong coolant in it: it had the Ford Green coolant from the factory/dealer (I ordered it and got it with less than 4 miles on the odometer). I replaced it all with CAT EC-1 spec'd coolant (Shell Rotella IRC).

Do what you want with your vehicle but I would never use Ford Gold coolant in a 6.0 diesel, period. The Ford Gold is a pretty good universal coolant but not for applacations where it is subjected to high temps, like in an EGR cooler. It contains silicates, these silicates come out of precipitation at high temps and will plug up the 6.0 oil cooler coolant passages.

Case in point: a friend of mine that had a 2004 with around 90k miles. EGR coolant leak diagnosed by the local Ford dealer. Even though my friend had the extended warranty, it would not cover it due to it being caused (they said) by "contaminated coolant) even though both the local dealer and his original dealer in VA both went to bat for him (warranty was through a third party, not Ford).

Since it wasn't covered by warranty and he had to pay for it himself, he got to keep the old parts, including the oil cooler, which he gave to me to cut up for research purposes.

Here are two pics of the oil cooler, you can clearly see that the coolant passages (the smaller ones) are almost completely clogged. He has since installed a coolant filter and has switched over to ELC (actually Ultra ELC) coolant.

IMG_2267Medium_zps083c1468.jpg


IMG_2266Medium_zps30aafe7d.jpg


So, I'm going to say it again just to make it absolutely clear: If you have a Ford 6.0 diesel: Replace the Ford Gold coolant with CAT EC-1 spec'd ELC or Ultra ELC coolant asap; along with installing a coolant filter. When, not if, you're EGR cooler starts leaking, install an EGR delete kit.

There is no way I'd use Ford Gold coolant in a diesel with an EGR cooler.
 
   #37  

Scott65

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Hot ***** West Texas
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Sorry, not sure how to make those bigger. They were full size on my screen.

The image with ford gold is googled, not mine. Don't mind the beer can

I don't care what you run in yours. I'm sure cat is just fine. I was merely making an observation because alot of people put in green or dexcool not knowing the difference and regret it later. But its whatever...
 
   #38  

Scott65

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Hot ***** West Texas
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2013 Kubota L3301
That looks like a dead ringer for my description of when you mix different types of antifreeze. And if a ford is recommended to run ford gold antifreeze, and is then deemed to have contaminated antifreeze, would that suggest that it had something other than just ford gold antifreeze in it? It appears to me that came out of a truck that possibly had green antifreeze poured into it, possibly just to "top it off" at some point in its life, maybe by someone not knowing that it required ford gold instead.

And you say that ford gold is a good universal antifreeze. If you've used it as a universal, thats why you've had bad experiences. Its far from universal. Its used in alot of different models of fords, but not all, and certainly not mixed universally with anything else.

Edit:
Another note: Anything is possible, but I'm not sure how you got ahold of a 6.0 with green antifreeze unless someone tampered with it. I've been working on these trucks since inception, and have never seen one with green antifreeze from the factory. Only added by someone after the fact, and nearly always with detrimental results, just like pictured above

Edit again:
I can always admit being wrong. I have very vague memories of green coolant. Its been too long. I honestly don't remember if it was factory installed or not. It was rare to see, so they didn't do it very long if they did. Sorry about that
 
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   #39  

JLwoodworks

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Apr 24, 2014
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164
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Macedon,New York
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LS XR3135HC
Wow. Looks like you guys have had to do some serious work to keep those on the road. Was that covered under warranty? Did you get rid of the truck after that experience?

Didn't have to do most of what I did. It was all preventative. Mainly because other than times I'm towing heavy, it's left on+175hp tuning. Nothing crazy, but it dyno'd 430hp 800lb ft at the wheels. Sad that a new 6.7 will do that with just economy tuning.
Anyway, This truck had been the best I've had. Still have it with no intention of getting rid of it. **** things are so expensive, and I'd rather spend the money on other stuff. Like tractor attachments

Edit.
Really? Dam n had to be bleeped out? Guess I'll make sure I say darn next time
 
   #40  

Soundguy

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But on a diesel, the main reason is far more destructive. A diesel is a high compression motor. If you look at the last picture in FTG's post, you can see the rings around the tops of the cylinders. There are sleeves that go down through the block forming the cylinders, and surrounding the cylinders is the coolant. When the piston goes down, the turbo fills the cylinder full of air, the piston comes up, it compresses it as tight as it can. If its tight enough to stretch the headbolts (which is why you get blown head gaskets), its tight enough to "bulge" these sleeves. When the sleeves bulge out, it pushes the coolant out with it. When the piston goes back down and the valve opens, the sleeve relaxes. The problem that was occurring was the aftermarket coolant couldn't keep up. It was forming tiny bubbles, if you will. When the next cycle came around, the bubbles would pop, and the coolant would implode back against the sleeve. Over time this pressure washing effect would eat its way all the way through the sleeves and into the cylinders. Game over. The manufacturer specific antifreezes are formulated to "stick" to the sides of the cylinders to prevent this from happening.

or you can simply buy coolant with SCA/DCA addatives to prevent cavitation and electrolysis.
 
 
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