6.0 Power Stroke Questions

   #41  

Scott65

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Not sure what that is, lol. But maybe that's what's in the Ford gold. All I know is that any motors that I've worked on and used gold, and only gold, no problems. Don't get me wrong, I definitely agree to taking out the cooler, and adding the filter for added protection
 
   #42  

Soundguy

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supplemental coolant addative
 
   #43  

FTG-05

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The 2nd pic shows the CAT EC-1 ELC I've been discussing. It's red in color. Ultra ELC is yellow in color.

I replaced the green antifreeze at 40k miles; I had the EGR delete/head stud work done at 90K. When I bought the truck, I went to the parts dept. to get a couple gallons of antifreeze since I planned on adding a coolant filter (I knew about the EGR cooler problems well before I bought the truck). I asked for two gallons of antifreeze for the Ford 6.0, then when they brought it out, I asked again if it was for the Ford 6.0 diesel; both of them said "yep". It was the Ford Green antifreeze, same that was in the truck - hence I didn't think anything of it until almost two years later - bad on me.

CAT EC-1 spec'd coolant will not damage the Ford 6.0 engine. CAT EC-1 ELC is what International (the engine maker) specifies for their engine (called the VT-365) in industrial vehicles (tow trucks, deliver trucks etc.). Besides the difference in factory-filled coolant (Ford installs Ford Gold; International installs ELC), VT-365-engined trucks come with a coolant filter installed. Ford 6.0 vs. VT-365 engine failures are like night and day. FWIW.
 
   #44  

Scott65

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I see. I skimmed through the posts the first time. After having more time last night and going back through and reading some more of the details, I realized thats probably what you had done. When I first noticed the orange though, my initial instinct was "uh oh, he put dexcool". Its a shame that so much heat is introduced into these motors causing these problems. Otherwise, they are really good power plants. When a compressor goes out, there is a single fin on the fan shroud than can be cut out of the way to remove the compressor, cutting the labor time in half. But rumor has it that in my region (west texas, 100+ degree summers), the engine will start overheating. They will get so hot they will melt the oil filter stand pipe (this can occur from other reasons as well). People tend to do it this way though because they dread pulling the shroud out. IDK, maybe theres a trick to it or something. I know it looks daunting, but I can have it out, front and back portion, in less than 10 minutes.

Oh, speaking of reading back through the details. I remember someone mentioned that pulling the filter out had messed up the MAP sensor plug. It may not matter to you now, but for future diagnostic reference, your MAP sensor (also the boost sensor on a diesel) is on top of the heater box, passenger side. The sensor you are referring to is either the Mass Air Flow (on top of the hose) or the filter minder (on the back side of the canister housing).
 

FTG-05

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I see. I skimmed through the posts the first time. After having more time last night and going back through and reading some more of the details, I realized thats probably what you had done. When I first noticed the orange though, my initial instinct was "uh oh, he put dexcool". Its a shame that so much heat is introduced into these motors causing these problems. Otherwise, they are really good power plants. When a compressor goes out, there is a single fin on the fan shroud than can be cut out of the way to remove the compressor, cutting the labor time in half. But rumor has it that in my region (west texas, 100+ degree summers), the engine will start overheating. They will get so hot they will melt the oil filter stand pipe (this can occur from other reasons as well). People tend to do it this way though because they dread pulling the shroud out. IDK, maybe theres a trick to it or something. I know it looks daunting, but I can have it out, front and back portion, in less than 10 minutes.

Oh, speaking of reading back through the details. I remember someone mentioned that pulling the filter out had messed up the MAP sensor plug. It may not matter to you now, but for future diagnostic reference, your MAP sensor (also the boost sensor on a diesel) is on top of the heater box, passenger side. The sensor you are referring to is either the Mass Air Flow (on top of the hose) or the filter minder (on the back side of the canister housing).

I think I've pretty much clearly established that I have no hard feelings about what antifreeze I use in my F-350 PSD.

I mean if I'm good with using muddy ebola-diseased swamp water, then something like dexcool can't be too far behind......

:)
 

scoutcub

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I'm at 92K on my 6.0 and getting ready to do the mods. Heard from one guy that changing the Hi pressure pump and checking the valves for work is a must while it's cracked open......opinions?
 

FTG-05

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I'm at 92K on my 6.0 and getting ready to do the mods. Heard from one guy that changing the Hi pressure pump and checking the valves for work is a must while it's cracked open......opinions?

I just had the heads checked for warping and had the STC fitting (I think) replaced. If you haven't lifted a head yet, an EGR delete and head stud replacement should be pretty simple.

I had 90K when I had my 2006 done.

Good luck!
 

Scott65

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+1

Look around the cap on your "degas bottle", the overflow where you put your coolant in. If there is water or crust around it, pull the heads. If not, and your not blowing white smoke, its up to you.

Here's what I do, as a mechanic. There's alot to say about procedures that mechanics do, especially to those who bash on mechanics saying that we are all out to steal everyones money. Alot of times that is true, I will admit. But there are some of us that are honest and take pride in our work. With that said, even if you think something might be overkill, you also have to remember, even an honest mechanic HAS to overkill some things to save his own hide, if he's going to warranty something. So if I'm going to go to the extent of pulling a cab and do all of this work and spend this much of a customers money, I'm going to surface the heads and check the valves. For their sake, and for mine.

Assuming nothing has been done to your truck in the past, and you want it "bulletproofed", if your going to drive it another 100k, or whatever:

Pull the cab, resurface the heads and have the valves vacuum tested. They will probably check fine, most do. New gaskets, and head studs are a must. Replace the STC fitting on the pump, stand pipes, and oil cooler with ford OEM stuff! When you put injectors back in, seal kits are used. These kits come with all o-rings, including the high pressure oil oring that goes in the top. Alot of mechanics don't bother, and throw them away. NO! This is a very common failure. Insist on these being replaced. According to EPA, I can't really suggest that you delete the egr cooler, but take ftg-05's advice ;) And when you do, get the kit that comes with the up-pipe. It gets rid of the opening with the flow diverter. And replace the up-pipe on the other side if you want to be overly cautious. These fail somewhat often and make a screeching sound when building boost. Very obnoxious. When going back together, use a new turbo bolt down kit from ford, comes with new drain o-rings. Flush the cooling system well, including pulling the block drains. Refill with ford gold or as ftg suggested, the cat equivalent (again, I'm no chemist, I don't know). And use distilled water to mix. Throw in a blue fuel pressure regulator spring, new filters (don't forget the 2nd fuel filter on the frame rail), and your pretty bullet proof. Hope I didn't forget something. Its alot different trying to type everthing versus having the truck sitting here to look at, lol.

You can do more, you can do less. Depending on how bullet proof you want to be, and how much you want to spend. Its all a gambling game. Some people go a quarter million miles and have zero problems. Some people go 40k and the truck falls apart. But more often than not, I explain all of this to a customer that has had just one of these components fail, and they opt to replace the single component, and come back in 6 months and another has failed, then another, etc. Much more expensive to do it one at a time.

If your buds with the mechanic, that helps. He can help on the labor. Example, the turbo is already off, its a half hour or so to pull it apart and clean the carbon out of it if he was so inclined to do so. And 5 minutes to pull the exhaust back pressure sensor off and blow the carbon out of the tube that feeds it. Little things like that which will help your truck keep running better, longer. And if its someone that cares enough, he'll use the right parts the first time. If they don't know what they are doing, bolts will be lost and left out, brackets misplaced, wires misrouted and later chafed, etc.

Another thing to look at before you head off on a long journey with your newly bulletproofed truck. Have the mechanic look at the FICM voltage. You'll have 2 readings for battery voltage, and one that will be around 48 volts. 47 or 47.5 on a hard acceleration is ok, but anything below 47, the FICM is going out. Its going to leave you stranded soon, just like any of the other mods I mentioned above. So technically, its just as important to have checked as all the rest.

Lastly, have the calibration checked in your PCM. If its not withing the last year or so, have it reflashed. It deals with a couple of common problems, including cycling the turbo vanes to keep carbon clear, MAF/MAP/EBP correlation issues, and some issues with refueling with the key on causing a sticky fuel gauge. Some independent shops can do this, which is somewhat rare in my parts. I'm one of the few. Otherwise a dealership.

Sorry, I haven't re-read. This is probably very long. I'm good at rambling. But hey, at least I'm thorough. And I bet after all of this, I've still left some out. Haha
 
 
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