Barn sticker shock. WOW!

ovrszd

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Go back read post 1. WCD gave a description of what the price covered.

Wasnt much more than 10 yrs ago a friend had a 40 x 100 x 16 built, concrete floor, electric in the $20 -$30k range. Then his wife fooled around, and she now has it... It was built by PPB listed in a response above. Course he was also the mining engineer at the local portland cement factory, maybe he got a really good deal on concrete.

I kind of know the area where WCD is, his area will command a higher price, too close to yuppieville.

Yeah, I did reread post #1 before I posted my lengthy rant.

With the info listed a quote could easily vary $10K.

Then I reread most of the comparable offerings in subsequent postings. They too lack details.

In the OP's post #1, "some windows" were mentioned........ you wanna tell me what that describes and what would be a good price for them? Go ahead, give it a shot. :)
 

duffer

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Just to add a little more confusion for WoodChuckDad...

Have you even considered a "stick frame" barn/garage, instead of just a pole barn? Cost of pole barns around here are nutso!

I built a 30x30x12' high framed "garage/barn" with 18x9' OH door for $18,200 including full concrete floor. Have a block foundation that is 4 courses high. What is NOT included in my number is the exterior finish. Since you want steel, I suspect that would be more than my Hardee board siding, so I backed my exterior finish out of my number. But my "barn" is fully sheathed with 1/2" OSB under the siding.

Used 8/12 trusses, with 30yr shingles. If you do metal roof, that would likely add some cost to the roofing as well. I did the electric myself (piece of cake).

My point is, that since your location sounds some what isolated, you might find a local framer to build this type of building pretty cheap compared to the others.

Just a suggestion...maybe not a good one.
 

s219

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I do think it's good to price up stick framing in many cases, especially if you plan to really finish the barn, or pour a slab, or deck it out with certain features. All of those things can push a pole barn up in price and take away the value advantage. But aside from price, the main difference will be time -- pole barns can be put up and finished in days, whereas stick frame generally happens in weeks. Also depends on the size of the crew, etc, but pole barn has some advantages for speed and multitasking that you can't achieve with stick framing. A lot of the pole barn process involves tasks that can be done in parallel, whereas stick frame you have a lot of serial tasks and can't move on to the next step without completing the first. I think it's one of those things that until you have done it both ways and seen the pros and cons, it's not always a clear choice.

One other constraint around here -- if you're not doing the work yourself and have to hire it out -- is that most contractors that would do a stick frame job are busy building houses and making bigger bucks because the housing market is pretty strong. Finding one to do a smaller job like a barn could be tough, or maybe even finding one period could be tough. If the housing market takes a crap then this will all change. I remember when we were talking to builders in 2011-2012 when the housing market was at rock bottom, and we had our pick of the best in the area and the best subs. These guys were even taking remodel jobs back then, which they normally don't do.
 

flusher

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Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.
I started reaching out last week to a few builders in my state to get a quote on a 40 x 60 or a 40 x 80 pole barn. I am still looking around and talking to people but it seems that in my county there really are no buildings. So the builders are going to have to come from at least 60 miles away. I just got the first quote for a 40 x 60 with some windows, two man doors, and a 14 foot rollup door. This building would have 16 foot walls metal siding metal roof and that was it. It would have a cement floor. With those simple requirements he said 70s. I would be in the 70s probably upper 70s. He said the cement work would be about 16,000. That makes sense to me it痴 not too far off of what I figured since I just had my foundation for my house put in last year. I am flabbergasted. That is $30 a square foot. There is just no way. Absolutely no way on gods green earth that I would pay $75,000 for a 2400 square foot cement floor barn


$30 per sq ft. That's exactly what I paid in June 2005 for a 1000 sq ft metal shop building 24 x 42 ft, 12 ft walls, two 10x10 ft rollup doors, one man door, one window, concrete floor (6" thick, 4000 psi concrete, #4 rebar on 24" centers). $23 per sq ft x 1.30 inflation factor = $30 sq ft in 2019 dollars.

Shop-2.JPGShop-1.JPGShop floor.JPG

Good luck
 

buckeyefarmer

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APM didnt list a 16 high in their price examples, but a 40 x 60 x 12, one man door, one window, two slider doors is $14k in material. I would expect to go up to 16 ft will put it near $20k in material. Add your 16k for concrete (installed) thats at $36k. $70k is ridiculous. I would expect around $50k built, thats $14k just for barn labor.

Pole barn companies tend to travel long distances to build. 60 miles is nothing.
 

YanmarFever

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I just put up a 36x60 all steel building, it has to withstand a 180 mph hurricane wind force.
3 roll ups, 1 man door and concrete 12" thick + permits and fees.

It cost a lot more than I thought it would, but that's the price we all pay to store our tractors, trucks and tools from the elements and thieves . Its not the same world our Dads grew up in, that's for sure !
 

cat fever

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I just put up a 36x60 all steel building, it has to withstand a 180 mph hurricane wind force.
3 roll ups, 1 man door and concrete 12" thick + permits and fees.

It cost a lot more than I thought it would, but that's the price we all pay to store our tractors, trucks and tools from the elements and thieves . Its not the same world our Dads grew up in, that's for sure !

None of my business for sure, but what do you need 12" thick concrete for? :confused3:
 

YanmarFever

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None of my business for sure, but what do you need 12" thick concrete for? :confused3:

I am (guessing) you have never ridden out a major hurricane. I have seen tile roofs (trusses and all) flying in the air.
Tornadoes will pile up cars like toys, barbecues will wrap around a telephone pole, and lawns stripped off like cake icing.
Our building is all bolted down to the 12" concrete (hopefully) to withstand all this. (Lord willing)
 

cat fever

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Ok, makes perfect sense now.

You are correct, I have never been around a hurricane. I did ride through Moore Oklahoma just after they had the F5 tornado about 4-5 years ago. The devastation was unbelievable.
 

ovrszd

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It's not the thickness of the concrete that increases storm survival. It's how the building is anchored to said concrete. Then it's the ability of the structure to stay intact.
 
 
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