House Build

   #1  

bannerd

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Is there anything out there that will allow a concrete truck to back up to a bin with an auger. Pump trucks around here are insane and I can't justify paying 20K putting a 30x50 house foundation in the 40K range.

I was thinking a little over half yard of concrete could be dumped into a bin with an 8"/6" hose hook up that a backhoe could lift and gravity feed or force with a auger. I remember doing my fathers house and he used 5/8 rebar with a lot of cold joints and it still stand 40 years later. I would like to avoid this and at least get a decent pour for the footers/floor and ICF walls.

Let me know !
 
   #2  

3Ts

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I would think that the truck could reach 15' easily assuming you have access to both sides of the 30x50 slab. If not, maybe you could leave about a 10' section of foundation undug so the truck could back into the area and pour as it pulls out. Then when you're close, dig out the last piece of foundation and pour that with the last truck.

I don't know about gravity feed. I don't think it would work very well unless the concrete was really watered down. There are auger buckets with hoses that will pump it horizontally quite a long way. I've seen them used for pouring patios in housing developments where there is only a 5' wide access to the back yard. Don't know where you'd find one though.
 
   #3  

RedNeckRacin

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I guess I'm not quite understanding the restrictions? A chute will easily reach 15' when pouring down from above the basement. They do make concrete pumps that will push concrete various distances. I'd starting calling some local mix plants and contractors to see what your options are.
 
   #4  

Cord

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There's a half dozen ways this could be done. For ICF, a pumper truck is without question the most productive. Don't forget, you're not just paying for the truck, but also for the masons who are standing around waiting for concrete.

There are concrete buckets which can be rented that would be mounted to the forks or hung by a chain from a telescopic forklift. It's slow (see above), but would get the job done.

BTW- cold joints are a failure insitu and are structurally unacceptable.
 
   #5  

3Ts

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Here's a picture of what I was referring to in my post above. You should try contacting a rental yard or some of the concrete or masonry contractors to see what they can do.

trailer-mounted-line-pumping.jpg
 
   #6  

EddieWalker

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Once the concrete starts pouring, you really want it to be done as quickly as possible. Pumpers are expensive, but a lot cheaper then a poorly done concrete pour.

If you cannot get the cement truck close enough to the forms, and there is no way that you will pay for a pump, there are attachments to pick up a yard of concrete from an excavator or a crane that is picked up and held over the location you want it poured. A lot of commercial concrete companies around here in East Texas have them and they use an excavator to do this. It really depends on access and how much you can save.

A picture of the site and the forms would be very helpful.
 
   #7  

flusher

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Is there anything out there that will allow a concrete truck to back up to a bin with an auger. Pump trucks around here are insane and I can't justify paying 20K putting a 30x50 house foundation in the 40K range.

I was thinking a little over half yard of concrete could be dumped into a bin with an 8"/6" hose hook up that a backhoe could lift and gravity feed or force with a auger. I remember doing my fathers house and he used 5/8 rebar with a lot of cold joints and it still stand 40 years later. I would like to avoid this and at least get a decent pour for the footers/floor and ICF walls.

Let me know !


Here's how the stem walls were poured for the foundation of my manufactured home in 2005.


DSCF0070.JPGDSCF0071 (Small).JPGDSCF0085.JPG

The contractor used an trailer mounted concrete pump. Worked like a charm. Took about 2 hours to make the pour.

Good luck
 
  
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bannerd

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The house sits on a knoll, there is access to the top back side of the house. The front of the house that over looks a pond is the main problem. I had a site inspector come out from the ready mix plant and they can get the footers poured at the back side of the house footers. The main problem of concern is the front side which also has a frost wall. We thought about getting the concrete truck up the hill but with all the sand under the gravel road it's not possible as the truck would sink. Something like 3T is showing is what we need, the auger would force the concrete down the tube. The trucks could back in from the top side of the hill and pour from that remote site.
 
   #9  

Stimw

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A concrete pump uses a piston to pump the concrete not an auger.
They are common around here.
Should be able to rent one.
 
   #10  

Raspy

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Nothing will be as fast and efficient as a pumper, and making your own auger system seems ridiculously time consuming for this one project. But what about a tractor bucket? Do you have a fairly large tractor where you could make trip after trip from the truck to the forms? Might work for footings, but not for slabs. The finishers wouldn't like it, the reach is very limited and it will be slower, but it meets your goal of no pump.
 
 
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