? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation?

   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #21  

Carl_NH

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Jim

The pins to loop the chain link around, then backfill with some stone/mortar around the chain link then the pins also hold the top block from kicking out at the bottom.

Also makes it easier to align the blocks with the pin.
 

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   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #22  

BuilderML

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I don't think you'll like seeing the pins and chain link on the face of a finished wall. :2cents:
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation?
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jim_wilson

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I don't think you'll like seeing the pins and chain link on the face of a finished wall. :2cents:

Yeahhhh - I was thinking the same thing. One of the reasons I got the granite blocks is because they can be stacked and made to look like a nice tightly stacked wall - like you'd see on the side of a expensive building or something like that.
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #24  

Carl_NH

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Guys,

I agree it would not be the prettiest wall on the block.

One more suggestion I think was mentioned before is to build a false wall and face it with the granite.

Like 1/2" PT plywood 16" high with 2x4 every 4' driven/dug into the base with dead men tying it back into the bank? Would take 3 sheets of PT plywood and a few PT 2x4s - not terribly $$.
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #25  

dave1949

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Guys,

I agree it would not be the prettiest wall on the block.

One more suggestion I think was mentioned before is to build a false wall and face it with the granite.

Like 1/2" PT plywood 16" high with 2x4 every 4' driven/dug into the base with dead men tying it back into the bank? Would take 3 sheets of PT plywood and a few PT 2x4s - not terribly $$.

If you pour a concrete frost wall on a footer, then face that with the curbing, that would be the most permanent and strongest solution.

You would need to start on the footer with concrete blocks, the solid kind, then as you come above grade switch to the granite. The footer could use the frost-protected techniques to shorten the wall - if you can use the backside of the wall area, sounds like that is close to the property line. If not, then use a deep footer and taller frost wall.

This also opens up some design possibilities like interlacing the curbing with another colored stone or brick. Or, putting a cap stone across the top of the curbing and concrete. More work, more money, but it does open up some nice possibilities and longevity that you may appreciate in the long run.
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation?
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jim_wilson

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If you pour a concrete frost wall on a footer, then face that with the curbing, that would be the most permanent and strongest solution.

You would need to start on the footer with concrete blocks, the solid kind, then as you come above grade switch to the granite. The footer could use the frost-protected techniques to shorten the wall - if you can use the backside of the wall area, sounds like that is close to the property line. If not, then use a deep footer and taller frost wall.

This also opens up some design possibilities like interlacing the curbing with another colored stone or brick. Or, putting a cap stone across the top of the curbing and concrete. More work, more money, but it does open up some nice possibilities and longevity that you may appreciate in the long run.

That's pretty much what I was thinking of doing - except I keep hearing "frost wall" used - and I'm not sure how any sort of insulation in a retaining wall is going to make any difference - since there's no heated environment anywhere around the structure that the insulation will be holding the heat in for. My understanding of frost walls is that they only work when they're backing up a heated building.

On this retaining wall - it's going to be sitting 75 feet from the nearest structure - the ground is going to freeze all around it and I'm not sure I understand how a frost wall is going to change that.
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #27  

dave1949

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Jim,

There are two types of shallow frost-protected foundation methods. One is for heated buildings, the other is for unheated. There are some differences in where all the foam boards are placed between the two. If you check out the links, you will find the two methods.

Revised Builder's Guide to Frost Protected Shallow Foundations (FPSFs)
At the above link, open the "Full Report" 752 KB pdf. On document page 17, there is a diagram for unheated showing foam below the foundation. The whole report is good reading and everything you need to know is there.

In either case, the foam is isolating the ground (with an ambient temperature of ~45*F) from the ambient air temps in winter. The foam does need to extend horizontally far enough to prevent the frost from reaching the part which is actually being protected--the foundation. There are charts for different regions which specify how far that horizontal foam apron extension needs to be, how thick, and how deep the foam is buried.

In common usage, a "frost wall" is something set deep enough to prevent heaving and usually consists of a footer poured in a trench that is as deep as the frost penetration in the area, and a poured or layed block wall that sets on the footer and rises above ground.

In your case, either poured or block walls will need some sort of lateral support. This could be ells at the ends, and tee(s) in the mid-section depending on the length of the wall. And, you need free space on the footer next to the wall to support the granite curbing.

The masonry walls can carry a lot of vertical weight, but they are fairly easy to push over from the sides. a strong wind can blow down a tall block wall that is not laterally supported, for example.

You can incorporate the lateral support ells and tees into a built-in seating bench, planter, outdoor grill, etc., etc., limited only by your imagination and budget. :laughing:
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #28  

dstig1

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You are mixing terms a bit. A "frost wall" generally just means a proper footing and wall that goes down to the typical footing depth in your area. Around here that requires 4'. Down south it can be almost nothing. It has nothing to do with insulation, unless you start talking about a shallow frost protected footing, like I posted earlier (and another Dave just posted above - great Dave minds think alike! :) )
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #29  

dave1949

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You are mixing terms a bit. A "frost wall" generally just means a proper footing and wall that goes down to the typical footing depth in your area. Around here that requires 4'. Down south it can be almost nothing. It has nothing to do with insulation, unless you start talking about a shallow frost protected footing, like I posted earlier (and another Dave just posted above - great Dave minds think alike! :) )

I think that is the confusion point--frost wall combined with frost protected. I guess technically, a shallow frost-protected wall or foundation is still a frost wall, it's just that the insulation artificially reduces the frost penetration depth.

So, in an area with normal frost depth of 4', an insulation frost-protected wall could be only 2' deep, for example, but it still functions as a frost wall.

There are a lot Dave's around, it was a very popular early baby boomer name.
 
   / ? on proper install of wall in area subject to freeze - base preparation? #30  

Rustyiron

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I've been told that an inch of foam equals a foot of (ground) cover. This is related to Dave1949's comment about the ambient ground temps and a lesser actual wall depth to avoid heaving. The whole burried foam thinking is to keep the heat "in the ground" and away from the (possible) 0 deg or less air temps. Heat allways seeks cold. I have seen insulation work in a well line over ledge (bedrock) that could not be installed below frost & was going to be plowed...... no snow cover, also a great insulator.
 
 
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