I have a bad feeling about this

RoyJackson

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John Deere 4052R Cab,, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements
Hope it’s not rusted rims, but it very well could be.
Still have no idea why anyone would put a corrosive liquid in their tires, but it is what it is.
CaCl is very cheap liquid ballast compared to other liquid ballast.
Like you, I'd never use it...windshield washer fluid has been the ballast in the tractors I've owned.
However, there are a lot of old (I mean old) tractors around that have had CaCl in their tires for decades
 

Texasmark

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Apr 24, 2012
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3,352
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N. Texas
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Ford: '88 3910 Series II, '65 3000; '07 6530C Branson with FEL, 2020 LS MT225S. All Diesels
Tractor is 11 years old and I believe they were filled (Calcium Chloride) by the original owner at purchase. How scr*wed am I? Both rear tires are like that. I doubt it's the valve because on the other side, the valve is not even at the bottom. It has a salty taste.

View attachment 716205
Its because CACL is dense and cheap. OEM installation would be a tube type tire, with proper hygiene to ensure that non of it spilled where it wasn't wanted. With that said, no way for owner to experience any ill effects.

Case 1: Welcome reality....tube fails for one reason or another....hello problem. Case 2: Installing with a tubeless tire where it immediately contacts the wheel.
 
  
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SylvainG

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Jan 30, 2021
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551
Location
South West, Qc
Tractor
Kioti LK30
Those pics show the old tires still had the vent spews. Doesn't look like a tire that would "fall off the rim".
Did they save the "old tires"?
Or did they say "well they were so bad we had to charge $100 disposal fee".
And the rim looks like it got the original paint worn off in places.


As a side note my 2 NEW rear turfs were about $850 TOTAL. The rears are 33x12.5x15.
/edit - I did not get them loaded because I've a backhoe for ballast :)

They didn't replace the tires, just patched them where the old patches fell off.

Edit. Just reread my message. It's a misunderstanding. It's not the tires that fell off, but the patches that were on the inside of the tires.
 
  
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SylvainG

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South West, Qc
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Kioti LK30
Got my bill:

$150 for the travel (120 km total)
$180 for the repair
$160 for two tubes (19.5 tubes with TR218 valve)
$12 for a 4"x4" patch
$25 for 10 gallons of Calcium Chloride

For a total of $527

Feeling better about this :)
 

jonsstihl

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Quebec, Canada
was it a local guy or a large chain of stores. sounds like you got a decent deal. I'm assuming that is CAD so in USD that would be about 400$

those rims really don't look too bad.
 
  
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SylvainG

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South West, Qc
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Kioti LK30
It's a small shop that is affiliated with Kal Tire which is a retailer/distributor here in Canada. Yes, for the work done, I think it's fair. By the texts he sent me (those pictures above are from him), he was there for about three hours. If you add the travel time, it took him over half a day's worth to fix the tires.
 

Golden Rocket

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Oct 18, 2012
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41
Location
River Glade, New Bruncwick, Canada
Tractor
International B276; Kubota GR2000, NH T1510
I will list the equipment (with pics) of the setup I have used - bear with as I gather my already taken shots - I will be back
Alrighty - see if I get this right - as long as the pic remains, then I did ok I guess.

Pic 1: the pump is just a pump I bought from HD (was it ever fast) did one tire in under 18 mins I think it was. The manifold is just a garden hose bib manifold, the pressure gauge is garden hose connection (off the shelf), the pail is to simply to be the reservoir and of course the WSWasher fluid (-40), the green hose has a quick connect for water hose, this attached to the air/water valve that screws onto the valve stem, the two black hoses are washing machine hose (due to the need of two female connectors)

Pic 2: just gives a blow up of the connections

The connection is a tad slow tonight (this morning actually) - I'll come back again

Pic 3: the empties (just one tire)

Pic 4: From Reservoir to tire and from tire to reservoir - this saves a big mess when needing to release the pressure buildup (as it slowly occurs)

Pic 5: Hose on the left is from the reservoir - open when pumping - hose on right returns to reservoir, closed while pumping - the opposite for both when releasing the pressure buildup - centre hose (if using for water hose, would be the inlet) goes to/from the tire valve

Pic 6: Valve connection - this line goes to the distribution block

If your pump has the capacity of this little one, then make sure your reservoir is big enough to hold two or three jugs at least - the size is also beneficial to reduce the splash experienced when releasing the pressure build up - I found it best to keep the return/bleed line out of the fluid in the reservoir. Pump for a while - watch your gauge for pressure build up, when you see it, simply stop the pump, close the feed valve (distr block), open the return valve (distr block) and simply let the pressure off. Oh yes - open ALL of your jugs before even starting to run the pump, that way, while it is running, all you have to do is pour - I did not do that with the first tire and first few jugs, but I could not keep adding fluid fast enough because of opening them during the process so stopped and opened all jugs.

It is important that the tire valve stem is at the top-most point for filling, bottom-most point for emptying (connect at top-most) - have the tractor on jack stands, this does two things, eliminates weight pressure on the tire when there is no air pressure in it and thus aids in not losing bead/rim connection - secondly, you can rotate the tire as needed anytime throughout the process. While filling, it was a nice aid in determining that the tire was indeed filled with liquid

The emptying aspect, is all in reverse however, gravity will take care of a large part of the emptying until it reaches a point of balance due to height differences of the tire valve and the reservoir - the pump, will NOT remove all fluid as there is nothing to reach thru the tire valve and down into the tire so you will always have some left in the bottom - but one heck of a lot lighter then filled

Hope this helps - if you go to F/B and see Dave Knows Best - he has a vid there of him doing his tires, it is where I got plan from

Don't think I am missing anything - you will get some mess, but it is far less then not having this for the empty process as well as the bleeding of pressure (lots will do it right at the air/water valve at the tire - messy, messy, messy) - if you look closely at pic two, see the little circle (on the air/water valve inserted in the quick connect), that is a bleeder valve for releasing pressure - just don't press it and you won't get fluid pissin out.

Cheers for now
 

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SmallChange

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Apr 19, 2019
Messages
301
Tractor
New Holland WM25 with 200LC front end loader, filled R4 tires 43X16.00-20 and 25X8.50-14 (had a Kubota B6200D with dozer and R1 tires)
But if you want to resolve the problem, you might do better at an Ag/Industrial tire dealer.

This is a bit of a hijack, sorry, but your comment makes me curious. What can you tell me about Ag/Industrial?

The reason I bought the NH tractor I did is that the NH local dealer was so good. They paid attention to me and tried to help me out finding something used elsewhere when it didn't look like they had a used tractor that fit my stated needs. When I got a better idea what prices were, and reconsidered my available money, I decided to go new, and they took great care of me on that too. Meanwhile the Kubota dealer treated me like an annoyance, and the JD dealer was only a little better.

Well, the excellent NH dealer is an Ag/Industrial.

So, what's their story? I can imagine my local dealer would help resolve the problem in this thread. But why specifically did you suggest that? It's a chain, right?
 
 
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