GM 2.7 I-4 Turbo gas engine.

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Ford850

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I don't know how they compare, but you need to look at the torque and HP curves of both. I know the little turbo engines from Ford produce much better torque at low RPM compared to the V8, even though the top numbers might be lower.
 
  
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WilliamBos

WilliamBos

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Have you considered the little inline 3.0 six cylinder, I drove one a few weeks ago.
It's an impressive little motor with great torque.
I thought about it, but the emissions equipment scares me.
 
  
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WilliamBos

WilliamBos

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It's got 2 high, AUTO, 4 high, and 4 low. AUTO is part-time AWD, where it sends all the power to the real wheels until it detects wheel slippage through sensors, then it sends power to the appropriate wheels as needed.

4x4 splits 50-50 between front and back all the time.
It is auto 4x4, not AWD. Only one wheel up front grabs, the rear has the G80 Locker which only locks when needed. There are clutch packs in the transfer case that lock when a when needed. And 4Lo is optional, only standard on certain models, such as the Trailboss.
 

Monster5601

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I thought about it, but the emissions equipment scares me.

I think a lot of the past issues with the emissions of on-the-road diesel-powered pick-ups should be left in the past where they occurred. I have been running a RAM Cummins 3500 since the spring of 2015 with zero issues. I'm currently shopping to replace my 2013 RAM 1500 and the choice has come down to another RAM with the ECO diesel (3rd generation) or the Silverado with the I-6 Duramax. That I-6 Duramax is impressive with its power and fuel economy.

My son leased a new Silverado with the 2.7L, he primarily travels around town and he is OK with it but he commented he is unlikely to repeat this choice.
 

LouNY

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My little 3.0 eco diesel has 92000 miles on it. It has been a decent motor.
I have been worried about it at times from all the horror stories I hears about it.
I have lost the tone wheel on it which was a two day down time and an engine temperature sensor,
which took two trips to the dealer to replace because they didn't have one in stock.
Then a couple of recalls which were a couple of hours each. But that little 3.0 engine has
impressed me. for the power and torque that it produces with only 183 cu.inches.
When I was contemplating buying a new pickup this winter the only two engines,
I was pricing out where the 3.0's from GM and RAM.
 

Hay Dude

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Just bought a 2020 Jeep Rubicon 2 door with a 2.0L gas turbo. We were all set to buy one with the 3.6L V-6. Once we saw the specs on the 2L, we were sold.
We drove both and found the 2L much smoother, more linear and much quieter on acceleration. It actually has more torque than the 3.6L.
I am a big fan of Diesel engines and fully understand what turbocharging does. Its an amazing way to pull much more power off a smaller displacement engine.
 

Tractorable

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Toyota is coming out with their new Tundra soon which is rumored to have the 400+ hp twin turbo V6 out of the Lexus LS500. I’m waiting to see what the specs are on it before pulling the trigger on a new truck. It’ll either be a new Tundra or Ford Super Duty with the 7.3L V8.

In principle, I’m not a fan of the complexity of turbo motors but with Toyota reliability I might consider it.
 

Blue Mule

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I believe the 2.7 hair dryer will replace the 4.3 V6,no big loss there ,owned a couple in full size trucks.They were o.k.but not much better mpg than a V8.
I have seen 23mpg on the high-way with the 5.3 V8 with my last four full size trucks.
The 2.7 would make a nice motor for the Colorado also.

Apparently for 2022 the 2.7L hair dryer is also replacing the 5.3L V8 in a large part of the Silverado lineup. Very dumb move, but I wouldn't expect anything less from GM who has made the worst truck on the road since the GMT400 platform came out in 1988.

Just bought a 2020 Jeep Rubicon 2 door with a 2.0L gas turbo. We were all set to buy one with the 3.6L V-6. Once we saw the specs on the 2L, we were sold.
We drove both and found the 2L much smoother, more linear and much quieter on acceleration. It actually has more torque than the 3.6L.
I am a big fan of Diesel engines and fully understand what turbocharging does. Its an amazing way to pull much more power off a smaller displacement engine.

The 2.0L has slightly more torque, but also has slightly less horsepower than the 3.6L. Almost all media reports have shown better passing power with the 3.6L and a smoother experience. the 2.0L also costs more, gets less MPG in the real world if hundreds of thousands of combined miles of owner data is to be believed on Fuelly.com, and is far more complicated (MGU instead of traditional alternator, 48V battery pack and associated wiring, coolant lines that run under the vehicle, dual coolant tanks to maintain, requirement of higher octane fuel, direct injection which coats the valves with carbon and requires periodic induction cleaning, etc. etc. etc.) which is terrifying beyond warranty expiration. They already had lots of engine fires with those also, which prompted a recall/TSB.

By contrast, the 3.6L has been around for an entire decade, has been on the Ward's Best Engines list in multiple years, is as simple as a modern V6 engine gets, and has a stellar track record powering everything from muscle cars to SUVs to vans to full size trucks.

It's amazing how many people take the bait hook, line, and sinker as soon as an automaker promises a superior experience without doing any real world research. Between those two engines, I go 3.6L every single time when I'm shopping vehicles that offer them. I've had 4 separate 3.6L engines in 4 separate vehicles and all of them were flawless, efficient, and strong.
 

Hay Dude

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Remember, I didn’t buy a new Jeep, I bought a used one. After test driving both, the 2L accelerated smoother more linear and makes more torque. When the 3.6L dropped a gear on acceleration, it was very harsh and noisy. The NVH on that engine was terrible. Sounded like something that was from the 90’s.

And dont tell me I didn’t do my research, either. I did plenty. In the one we chose, the manufacturer covered the vehicle powertrain for 7/100k, so even if something happens, I am covered. We added a $20/month bumper to bumper 7/100 warranty on top of that.
Sometimes it’s about the deal you are offered more than a chart of specs. I got a loaded ‘20 Jeep with a longer warranty for thousands less than a less loaded new 21 Jeep with a 2L or 3.6. I’m fine with it.

People get too nuts over Charts, graphs and specs.

On the road, with a soft top or no top, the 3.6L it sounded more like one of my farm tractors than an SUV. For less money, I will take the higher torque and quieter smoother power. Also, the fuel economy much better for stop and go driving (which is 90% of our driving). The 3.6L would have resulted in us having to spend considerably more fuel for all our stop/go driving.
 

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