Desperately need to fix driveway

   #41  

bcp

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The problem with the box scraper is that the height has to be adjusted above grade with the hitch control or it wants to move massive amounts of gravel (as is its purpose), and once adjusted it will only make the washboard worse as the tractor rear end rocks up and down on the existing hills and dales. It really needs to float on the surface.
...
Comments?

Try lengthening the top link all the way so the box blade rides on the rear blade only.

Bruce
 
   #42  

Williy

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THIS COULD GO ON FOREVER and now for my
drive way its only approx 500 ft and when it rains on it I get pot holes and its caliche have water run off from
the neighbor so think will put a cattle guard in there
so water will run under it because a pipe will fill up
with dirt etc.

WILLY
 
   #43  

fried1765

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A Cat grader at work. The rear blade With gauge wheels tries to emulate this action.
A rear blade is the proper tool for the OP problem.
There is a learning curve for it's use however.
Think EA Deluxe Scrape blade, particularly if it can be adapted with gauge wheels.
Egon has exactly the correct suggestion.
 
   #44  

Egon

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A rear blade is the proper tool for the OP problem.
There is a learning curve for it's use however.
Think EA Deluxe Scrape blade, particularly if it can be adapted with gauge wheels.
Egon has exactly the correct suggestion.

My suggestions are simply age old road building techniques which have stood the test of time. They were used well before my time!

There are innumerable articles on aggregate sizing and compaction.

As to equipment look at You Tube. Lots & lots of information on all the latest and best tractor pulled implements and their really “good looking product“ that would never meet proper inspection methods. Then look at construction roadwork equipment and methods that have to meet tested conditions. ( A lifetime ago I was on site for many a day of grade construction. “) (equipment of the time will date me; D9H, Cat 631, cat 641, Cat #16, first ones, cat 14, cat 12, vibratory packers drum & sheep’s foot, 988. I did not operate.)

In Europe there are quite a few tractor based road renovation implements. Some will be very effective But probably very costly.
 
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   #45  

fried1765

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My suggestions are simply age old road building techniques which have stood the test of time. They were used well before my time!

There are innumerable articles on aggregate sizing and compaction.

As to equipment look at You Tube. Lots & lots of information on all the latest and best tractor pulled implements and their really “good looking product“ that would never meet proper inspection methods. Then look at construction roadwork equipment and methods that have to meet tested conditions. ( I have been on site for many a day of grade construction. “

In Europe there are quite a few tractor based road renovation implements. Some will be very effective But probably very costly.
Re roadwork construction: Think they will ever finish NS 103?
Little bits over time = forever!
 
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   #46  

CoyPatton

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The main road does not need to be higher than the surrounding terrain...As long as the flow line of the ditches is below the driving surface and they are wide and deep enough to carry the capacity of runoff...

I initially took issue with this statement. Then upon further reading, I understand what the commenter is saying.
However when folks say the road must he higher than the ground around it —it must be!
A road with a ditch beside it that has a lip where the toad is lower then the lip going into the ditch (look at photo with trees on right side—left side of photo can not shed water) will not shed water. If there is a slope running the length of that road, it will erode the drive. If it is flat, it will effect the base of the road from standing water seeping in soil.
Water shedding/drainage is also the priority for the driveway.
The coverings largely depends upon your location and soil types—there is no 1 solution.
Point in case what works in clay soils will not work in sandy soils.
 
   #47  

CoyPatton

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I just when back and looked at OP’s 1st post. Particularly at type photos posted.

Some specific comments related to the photos
1) forget trying to crown your complete driveway!
Folks before you go wild!!!! go look at the 2 photos!!! She has spots shown that are mild banked curves, water will always drain to the low side. If you have a stretch of flat area, crowning would be good in those areas.
2) you need ditches! With the trees close to your drive that can be seen, you may not be able to cut ditches with your tractor. Some trees will have to go, while others are going to have roots where you need the ditch to be. Personally, if I were doing it, this is a job for a medium sized mini excavator. Once a ditch is established, by picking the ground conditions it can be maintained and shaped with your tractor and an offset rear blade.
It is difficult to tell based upon the limited view of the photos, but full length ditches may not be what best meets your needs. ‘Short’ (relative term) ditches on the bottom on the curve slope dumping into a natural low spot, built retaining pond, natural creek or other water control feature may better serve your needs.
3) with those ‘banked’ curves, you will have gravel movement. In my opinion it will be pushed to the high side by vehicles traveling too fast. As well as water flow and gravity will roll gravel down hill. You can reduce some of both effects with some fines in the gravel. You do not ever want to have ‘creek’ gravel on those areas. In my area, creek gravel is often solid my land owners that have creeks on their property. It is typically very smooth and will roll/slide always.
 
   #48  

Snobdds

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Shot, shot...
The main road does not need to be higher than the surrounding terrain...As long as the flow line of the ditches is below the driving surface and they are wide and deep enough to carry the capacity of runoff...
Chaser
LoL...Exactly what is it you don't understand ??...an open storm water sewer is not so different than a contained system (pipes/catch basins etc...)...it all about gravity and flow line elevations...

If a road bed is significantly higher than the surrounding terrain...if the road, lane etc is crowned there is no need for ditches...
...try cutting a road through the mountains and making the road higher than the mountain...LoL...!

So in other words, the road needs to the high point in the equation. Ditches always have a fall line down hill, but laterally, they still need to be lower than the road surface to drain water with the crown as the force of gravity.
 
   #49  

Egon

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Re roadwork construction: Think they will ever finish NS 103?
Little bits over time = forever!
Seeing as my travelling is limited off peak traffic hours suit me fine. Chances are it will get finished just as more upgrades are required.
 
   #50  

fried1765

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Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, 8N Ford, Gravely 12 HP "Professional", 48" SCAG Liberty
I just when back and looked at OP’s 1st post. Particularly at type photos posted.

Some specific comments related to the photos
1) forget trying to crown your complete driveway!
Folks before you go wild!!!! go look at the 2 photos!!! She has spots shown that are mild banked curves, water will always drain to the low side. If you have a stretch of flat area, crowning would be good in those areas.
2) you need ditches! With the trees close to your drive that can be seen, you may not be able to cut ditches with your tractor. Some trees will have to go, while others are going to have roots where you need the ditch to be. Personally, if I were doing it, this is a job for a medium sized mini excavator. Once a ditch is established, by picking the ground conditions it can be maintained and shaped with your tractor and an offset rear blade.
It is difficult to tell based upon the limited view of the photos, but full length ditches may not be what best meets your needs. ‘Short’ (relative term) ditches on the bottom on the curve slope dumping into a natural low spot, built retaining pond, natural creek or other water control feature may better serve your needs.
3) with those ‘banked’ curves, you will have gravel movement. In my opinion it will be pushed to the high side by vehicles traveling too fast. As well as water flow and gravity will roll gravel down hill. You can reduce some of both effects with some fines in the gravel. You do not ever want to have ‘creek’ gravel on those areas. In my area, creek gravel is often solid my land owners that have creeks on their property. It is typically very smooth and will roll/slide always.
"Crusher run" (usually defined as 3/4" minus) packs tightly together and is what works best.
"Creek gravel" is small rounded stones, and will not stay in place!
 
 
 
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